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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of questions that you gurus may know the answer to:

I need new rear springs (rear wheel camber) as well as new front shocks on my 99 V6. I am wondering to go down the route of eibachs with Koni STRs? Having previously owned a 2 litre I would say the V6 sits lower than the twinny - is this true? If so maybe I should just stick to OEM springs?

I am also due to powerflex the back end, I did this on my twinny. I have spare spring pans and dogs legs already powerflexed- are the rear spring pans the same for the twinny as well as the V6?

Follow on question (for my interest only). If the spring pans are the same and the rear subframe is the same then is the spring size optional i.e. could twinny springs be fitted for v6 springs and vice versa?

Thanks
 

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I don't know much, but I believe that the V6 sits about 10mm lower. It also has a wider track than the 2L. As the subframe, spring pans and dog legs are the same (dimension wise - there were some joint differences, but they were I believe interchangable) the only explanation for the track seems to be the different rear hubs. Don't know whether this slight widening could also contribute to the lower ride. From the eper, it seems the TS CF3 can have the 3L rear springs.

I'll sit back and wait to be corrected
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Clownfish - All you said makes sense to me.

I'm thinking the camber on the rear wheels (angled in towards the top) means that the rear springs are becoming tired?

I actually have some TS CF3 spare springs so I might see if they fit, although all springs should fit if the spring pans and sub frames are all the same (less rose joints as Cf points out)?
 

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I thought excessive camber was a sign that the alignment needed re-doing (using the adjustable tie rods).
 

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The tie rods will not adjust the camber (wheel vertical lean) angle, they do the toe in/out (steer) angle. the camber angle is a product of the hub changing angle as the upper and lower wishbone and spring pan/lower link move through different radius arcs. The ideal is to keep as bigger contact patch as possible on the road; as you corner the outer spring loads and inner spring unloads causing the body to roll about a theoretical roll centre. The arcs that the upper and lower links scripe are carefully calculated to keep the wheel upright, and hence the largest tyre contact patch, during cornering. Due to the sporting nature of the set-up on the GTV they have some static negative camber at the rear, if you've got excessive negative camber then your springs are sagging, or someone has replaced them with lower springs, thus inducing a larger static camber angle as the upper and lower links have effectively scribed a partial arc.

Edit: if your bushes are very tired this could also increase the negative camber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The tie rods will not adjust the camber (wheel vertical lean) angle, they do the toe in/out (steer) angle. the camber angle is a product of the hub changing angle as the upper and lower wishbone and spring pan/lower link move through different radius arcs. The ideal is to keep as bigger contact patch as possible on the road; as you corner the outer spring loads and inner spring unloads causing the body to roll about a theoretical roll centre. The arcs that the upper and lower links scripe are carefully calculated to keep the wheel upright, and hence the largest tyre contact patch, during cornering. Due to the sporting nature of the set-up on the GTV they have some static negative camber at the rear, if you've got excessive negative camber then your springs are sagging, or someone has replaced them with lower springs, thus inducing a larger static camber angle as the upper and lower links have effectively scribed a partial arc.
Top info this.....thanks.
 
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