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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who ever designed these bloody brembo calipers needs to be shot, just after the t**t who didn't grease the pins last time the pads were changed, what sort of clowns do main dealers employ? Replacement callipers on the way.
 

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Who ever designed these bloody brembo calipers needs to be shot, just after the t**t who didn't grease the pins last time the pads were changed, what sort of clowns do main dealers employ? Replacement callipers on the way.
The same ones that Stellantis will - no change!
 

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lol don't get me started on mechanics...

Almost every tyre fitter I've ever come across uses an impact gun to reattach wheel bolts with no f**ks given to the actual torque settings.

The brakes on my Honda have the disc screws in so hard that a previous attempt to get them off has utterly rounded them.

And finally both the rear brake bleed nipples were literally rounded off and needed a reverse socket thing to unscrew.

Have seen a garage service a brake calliper and leave the thing hanging off it's brake hose too.
 

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This is why I only take my car to my local Indy.
 

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I recently changed my disks and pads, front and back. The brembo pins were also seized. Pin remover and good whacking had no effects. I finally got them out with lots of wd40 and using a vice grip in order to wriggle the pin back and forth around its axis.
 

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Sometimes works if you cut the pin in the centre then wiggle/knock out each half and use a good penetrant such as Plusgas or focussed heat.
 

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Time and penetrating spray seems to work a treat if you can spare said time.


I managed to get the lower bolts off my shocks on my Honda with ease after spraying them with WD40 every day for a week prior to removal. Said shock had been on the car for about 13 years and exposed to the elements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
So it turns out there seems to be 2 different sizes of brembo 4 pot callipers for this piece fo s$$t car, WTAF alfa? so pi$$ed off with this now. It will be gone by the end of the month.

Looks like there's a red 330mm calliper, a silver 330mm calliper and a smaller silver calliper.
 

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Yes, depending on the engine size and trim level. From what I have seen, they are always ventilated discs for the front brakes :
  • less than 200hp -> 305 mm
  • 200 hp or more -> 330 mm
  • with Ti trim -> 330 mm and red paint

For the back, there are also different sizes, 278 or 292 mm. And some have ventilated discs, others have solid disks. Maybe 292 mm is always ventilated… I'm not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I love this car but I don't think it's worth the hassle, it's a nightmare every turn of the way, the simplest things trun into a full on drama, I guess that's the Italian blood in it. Back to the boring but very dependable old swedes for me I think. At least I can say I tried.
 

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Come on not so fast... you‘re just about to have it sorted an can go enjoy again.

(....btw, similar set of calipers are used on other brands and of which I’ve been told they have their flaws as well.)
 

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If you know the engine type, trim level and model year of your car, there should be no doubt about the installed brake system (unless it has been modified/replace by someone in the past). You could browse the online catalogue of a known supplier, like Brembo for example. They will tell you what brakes you need.

From your recent posts, I deduct that you have an '09 TBI. So it's rather simple, as all TBIs have the same size of rotors, only the color of the calipers changes ;)
 

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Come on not so fast... you‘re just about to have it sorted an can go enjoy again.

(....btw, similar set of calipers are used on other brands and of which I’ve been told they have their flaws as well.)
I can vouch for this being the case - identical calipers are used on my VW Touareg, and the same issue occurred. The issue is the brembo calipers are made of a different metal to the pins (steel vs aluminium), which causes the pins to react and corrode, essentially welding them in place. I took it to a local mechanic with fresh pins and pads, they had to cut and drill the old pins out before fitting the new equipment! Not looking forward to the job on my Ti when it comes around.... a bit of copper anti seize on the pins where they contact with the caliper will help for the future.
 

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I am afraid that no amount of grease will protect the pins from corrosion if they are not regularly serviced. If the pins have been in for the life of the pad then they have no chance, as BornRageFree said, it's the old steel vs Ali battle. Just wait until you need to remove the steel wheel bearing from the Ali upright 🤦‍♂️

I began my career as a mechanic with my local Honda dealership, completing an apprenticeship which I have to say was excellent - really good training and support. Although have seen and heard many things over the years that mean I do understand the reason that main dealers have a poor reputation, please do not tar us all with the same brush - that is completely unfair.

There are some excellent mechanics that work at dealers and also some that work at independents. There are some shocking mechanics that work at dealers, and also plenty that work at independents. It's just about finding a good one that you trust

Also tyre fitters certainly are not mechanics, do not be surprised that they do not own a torque wrench.

Finally I believe the skill of a good mechanic is not often recognised. I can guarantee you that I could have removed those caliper pins without writing off the caliper. Just because you can't do it yourself doesn't mean it's impossible. Also those countersunk disc bolts are always tight due to heat from the brakes and corrosion, the right tools go a long way and knowing just how to hit it to break the corrosion, it is perfectly possible to remove them without rounding them - but not actually that easy

Cheers
Mark
 

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Removing seized Brembo pins with very careful use of an angle grinder is easy with a bit of practice. I dont bother trying to drift them out anymore, waste of time and likely to miss and damage the caliper. Always cut them, saves a load of swearing.
 
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