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If the head comes off it really ought to be skimmed. A decent workshop will be able to take the minimum off, and of course, check for distortion which to the naked eye will not be obvious.
 

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Yes I know to drain the fluid before removing the head. Who knows where to look for traces. I'd just scour back both surfaces and clump the new one hope it blocks the gaps.
you will need to drain the block down before taking head off draining from rad drain will still leave coolant in that will escape when taking head off.
Not sure if there’s a block drain plug on those engine but taking water pump off should be enough.
it’s quite common to get coolant in bores after removing head,but as above a nice clean piston will identify a leak.
Also there is usually some marking on block or head if combustion has has been crossing to coolant jacket.
finally if removing head even if there’s an clear indication of gasket failure it’s always worth getting head pressure and flat tested before refitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Of course there is nothing like a flat sitting head and valves when the head is fitted back to the engine. It is worth getting it done.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
It looks like not an easy task for one being not used to working on engines in FWD cars with spaces being so cramped. Accessibility to bolts is limited. The intake manifold for one looks hard to get off. Can you keep it attached to the head when you take it out?
 

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Not actually done a 2.0 but over the years have done loads of different models, vauxhall,Peugeot,bmw etc and usually you can lift head with manifold in place. Might be some wiring attached or a bracket to block that needs removing first though
 

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Specifically with the JTS, I found the best method of head removal to be removal of the plastic inlet manifold first. The throttle body has to be removed first and that needs work from underneath also to do so but that is after removing the exhaust maniverter.

The most difficult parts are around the power steering reservoir. I found stubby spanners and use of 1/4" drive socket sets to be invaluable.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Where is the p/s reservoir at the front or back of the engine? And how hard are the cam cover and throttle body to take off?
 

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Hi, I just bought an Alfa GT 2.0L JTS. It is my very first Alfa. I haven't had much time to study the engine but before I found this issue it has about using up large amounts of coolant and emitting white smoke (with a distinctive hot coolant like smell) from the exhaust.

The engine timing and power is normal and there are no signs of a leaking head gasket nor can you see any coolant leaking from other parts of the engine like hoses or other components. Yet the reservoir level drops at a fairly fast rate and the smoke from the exhaust is a high.

I thought before I spent the time to look study the cooling system and try to trace the cause of the "leak" I was wondering if anyone knew of a common cause of the problem and was able to share some of their knowledge about the issue. Thanks
Hi, the obvious think to look for is the head gasket. There is another possibility however if the head gasket is not the culprit! This is the oil cooler: It can corrode internally, it is not visible until you remove it, and as a result water gets into the oil! My guess is that you have a gasket failure because you have white smoke, suggesting that the leak is near the cylinder head.
I hope this helps.
Chris
 

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I read my last post and it wasn't clear.
PAS reservoir is behind engine on inlet manifold side.
Throttle body is easy removal from above and held in with Torx fasteners.
Induction trunking uses reusable clips which really need Clic-R pliers.
Cam cover is also retained with Torx fasteners (or Ribe but Torx works).

The cylinder head is retained using Ribe bolts which need the correct size Ribe bit as they are tight (I'll update size later).

Timing belt work is best done with correct tools. That is cam locks which substitute 2 of the camshaft bearing caps to hold camshafts in position.
TDC on engine is best found with a mounting pillar and DTI gauge. Correct cam timing makes a significant difference to engine performance.

If you even wanted to take the sump off, guess what? Yes, once again fairly specific tools. This time it is very long Torx bits but that is all the 'special' tools you need other than small flexible hands, a good 1/4" socket set with a good selection of extensions and stubby spanners.

The only other issue is you are asking about easily removed things such as throttle body and can cover and that doesn't really bode well for other stuff which is considerably more awkward. That said, the only things which are a pain are the PAS reservoir and inlet manifold.

If you have the tools needed that really helps. If you don't, expect difficulty.
 

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That is a good list and source of tools needed.
Sump is listed with 7&8 size Ribe tools.
Generally the variator tool is not needed with the JTS (variators seem to last longer) but belt tensioning tools are very useful.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
That should cover it. OK. No I don't think there is another cause for the smoke and coolant loss. I started it again today and there is a noticeable miss fire now. I will see to the job next. Thanks guys for the help.
 
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