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Discussion Starter #1
So, (I know people hate posts that begin with so but hey it's my post!!) Quorn state their VEGAN chicken free slices are chicken free!! Well durrrr they're f'ing VEGAN!!!! It's implicit they are chicken/meat free!!!

IDIOTS!!!

And another thing, why do meat free products have to be manufactured to look like a meat product????
Meat free bacon slices
vegan sausages
Chicken/ham look alike sandwich slices

If it's plant based just make it look like a plant

Aghhhhhhhhhhhhhh
 

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Because mycoprotein is a form of single-cell protein, also known as fungal protein, is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary as "Protein derived from fungi, especially as produced for human consumption." "Myco" is from the Greek word for "fungus".
That’s quorn. Mould grown from a spawning a big tank. It has no form like a plant would have.
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
Yum yum, pig's bum as we used to say of my mother's cooking.

We have some quorn in the freezer. I'm taking my blowtorch to it tomorrow. Killing it with fire seems like the best option.
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
Makes mushrooms seem appealing :vomit:
 

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And another thing, why do meat free products have to be manufactured to look like a meat product????
Meat free bacon slices
vegan sausages
Chicken/ham look alike sandwich slices

If it's plant based just make it look like a plant

Aghhhhhhhhhhhhhh
^ This. Maybe three quarters of my meals are vegetarian, lots of them fantastic, but they (mostly) don't pretend to be anything else. The only exception is vegetarian shepherd's pie, which is a far far better thing when based on a complex sauce of lentils etc than than it is with minced shepherds.

As for quorn and tofu: I'd rather chew carpet underlay.
 

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We have some quorn in the freezer. I'm taking my blowtorch to it tomorrow. Killing it with fire seems like the best option.
It won't work. From my experience of BBQing the stuff, it's pretty much impervious to flame and heat.
 
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^ This. Maybe three quarters of my meals are vegetarian, lots of them fantastic, but they (mostly) don't pretend to be anything else. The only exception is vegetarian shepherd's pie, which is a far far better thing when based on a complex sauce of lentils etc than than it is with minced shepherds.

As for quorn and tofu: I'd rather chew carpet underlay.
It's not a taste thing more of the fact the food is for people who don't want to harm animals but then have the plant/fungus shaped and coloured to look like meat.

Eat what you like but don't pass it off as something else.

I had a rather nice lamb curry tonight
 

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My daughter has gone vegetarian and to allow us to have some easy family meals together without having to do a separate meal for her, we use the Quorn mince for Spag Bol or Lasagne. It's texture is a bit funny BUT it does take on the flavours from the sauces very well.


I remember watching a program recently on how they actually made it, it was quite interesting but I still prefer a Bacon sandwich anyday of the week.
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
Is this process applied to selecting the new Tory Leader? Or am I being deliberately mis - lead. You did say "Single Cell", so I thought there must be a link.
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
Not appetising at all. Although I doubt the inside of a slaughterhouse is much better. Better not to think about it.

I had a 24oz T-bone at the weekend and it was amazing. I know meat is ecologically pretty terrible but I think I would rather give up almost anything else first.

I'm not keen on vegetarian food made of fake-meat replacement stuff but there is plenty of nice vegetarian food you can make with just actual vegetables. My Mrs does a very nice curry with vegetables and cashew nuts, there's probably more flavour in it than a chicken curry.
 

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The fungus is grown in vats using glucose syrup as food. A fermentation vat is filled with the growth medium and then inoculated with the fungal spores. The F. venenatum culture respires aerobically, so for it to grow at an optimum rate, it is supplied with oxygen, and carbon dioxide is drawn from the vat. To make protein, nitrogen (in the form of ammonia) is added and vitamins and minerals are needed to support growth. The vat is kept at a constant temperature, also optimized for growth; the fungus can double its mass every five hours.

When the desired amount of mycoprotein has been created, the growth medium is drawn off from a tap at the bottom of the fermenter. The mycoprotein is separated and purified. It is a pale yellow solid with a faint taste of mushrooms. Different flavors and tastes can be added to the mycoprotein to add variety.[2]

A reproducible mutation occurs after 1,000 to 1,200 hours of cultivation in F. venenatum which greatly reduces the hypha length in the organism, which is considered unfavorable for production. Under normal conditions, this mutant strain will rapidly displace the parent strain.[1] Replacing ammonia with nitrate as the source of nitrogen, or supplementing ammonium cultures with peptone, prevents this mutant strain from overtaking the product but will still develop. Alternatively, the appearance of the mutant can be delayed by varying selection pressures such as nutrient concentrations or pH levels.[1]
Yuk. That's offal

Or is it just awful?
 
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