Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo Giulietta QC Launch Edition
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What's involved in changing the brake fluid? I've just replaced all the pads and discs, and would like to replace the brake fluid too.
The car is a '99 and I doubt the fluid has ever been changed, so it's in dire need.

Can anyone talk me through the process, as I've heard it can be quite risky if done improperly? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Think you undo bleed nipple and pour new stuff in the reservoir whilst pumping the brake pedal? No idea how you should attempt it if working alone? I'm going to have to do this soon too.
 

·
Regional Support, For Lincolnshire - AOL
Joined
·
16,368 Posts
Easiest way is to buy a bleed kit such as the Gunson Eze bleed, that way you can do it alone.

Standard procedure is to start at the wheel furthest away from the Master Cylinder and bleed until no air bubbles are present. Repeat for each wheel working towards the Master Cylinder. Leave the top off the Reservoir and ensure that the fluid levels are maintained.

This is the standard way of doing it, I'm not aware of anything different that would apply to the GTV, but it's possible.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
I'm not aware of anything different that would apply to the GTV, but it's possible.........
Think you're probably right, reservoir is shared with the clutch... don't suppose this will complicate things?
 

·
Regional Support, For Lincolnshire - AOL
Joined
·
16,368 Posts
Think you're probably right, reservoir is shared with the clutch... don't suppose this will complicate things?
Nope no problem with this, just keep the fluid levels up. I reckon doing a standard bleed job would work just fine, it's just that I haven't done it on a GTV so there just may be potential pitfalls that I'm unaware of.
 

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo Giulietta QC Launch Edition
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
So if I'm going to completely change the fluid, I just keep bleeding each brake until the new fluid appears, whilst topping up the reservoir with the new fluid?

Or can I use some kind of suction device to remove the bulk of the old fluid from the resovoir, fill it up with the new fluid, and then begin bleeding the brakes? As the old fluid is really, really dirty (been in for 8 years).

Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I've been trying to find out how to do this too....

The only point of concern I can find is it does mention in the workshop manual about not allowing air into the ABS module because it is "impossible to bleed out".

I reckon the way to go is bleed the old fluid out, whilst topping up with fresh (probably best done with two people!).

Removing the old fluid first and introducing air into the system will cause havoc...!
 

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo Giulietta QC Launch Edition
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I've been trying to find out how to do this too....

The only point of concern I can find is it does mention in the workshop manual about not allowing air into the ABS module because it is "impossible to bleed out".

I reckon the way to go is bleed the old fluid out, whilst topping up with fresh (probably best done with two people!).

Removing the old fluid first and introducing air into the system will cause havoc...!
But won't the old liquid simply mix with the new? That's why I was thinking we could simply empty only the reservoir, fill it with the new fluid, and then begin bleeding... I can't see how this would introduce air into the system, and it would also minimize the amount of fluid mixture.

But these are just my thought, I am by no means qualified to suggest anything. Killing the ABS unit is a massive worry.
 

·
Regional Support, For Lincolnshire - AOL
Joined
·
16,368 Posts
I'm no expert either and thinking about it I have never bled a system with ABS fitted, tend to let other people do my spannering these days.

I certainly wouldn't completely drain the system though, just keep pushing fluid through until clean stuff appears.

There must be someone on here who has actually done it ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Arse, whilst doing my brakes this week my system is probably mostly drained... nothing in the tank now I think. (My cling film didn't seal well enough :()

I wouldn't really worry about it mixing, after 100ml or so I'd imagine there would only be trace of the old stuff, it's not a large tank.

Does anyone know where the abs module is in case I need to rebuild it or something equally time consuming?
 

·
Regional Support, For Lincolnshire - AOL
Joined
·
16,368 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,314 Posts
Use a 100 ml syringe to suck the old from the reservoir, top up with fresh before proceeding to bleed the system. Do not allow air to get in as if it gets as far as the ABS pump you'll need big paddles to get up that creek!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42,287 Posts
What Armoore suggests. Suck as much as you can from the master with a syringe, and dump it. Then re-fill with new, almost to the top of the reservoir. Best then with the Gunsons Eezi Bleed, and your spare wheel, at about 20psi. Let it down to that pressure. Then, assuming you have no seized bleed nipples, catch the old fluid in a plastic bottle, using a piece of suitable tubing, until the new fluid comes through sparkling clean like.:): Opening and closing the nipples,in turn, and watch the level in the plastic Eezi Bleed bottle.:):
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Use a 100 ml syringe to suck the old from the reservoir, top up with fresh before proceeding to bleed the system. Do not allow air to get in as if it gets as far as the ABS pump you'll need big paddles to get up that creek!
Why? Surely the ABS stuff is free of fluid when initially fitted? Apparently bleeding with the key half turned solves this problem.
 

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo Giulietta QC Launch Edition
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Why? Surely the ABS stuff is free of fluid when initially fitted? Apparently bleeding with the key half turned solves this problem.
Yes, but who has the balls (read: money) to test that theory? :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
945 Posts
Yes, but who has the balls (read: money) to test that theory? :lol:
Well I'm painting all my callipers, replacing discs, pads, lines. The cling film over my reservoir didn't seal well enough so the fluid has dropped out, so I guess it will be me! Will hopefully have an answer end of next week.
 

·
Registered
Alfa Romeo Giulietta QC Launch Edition
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Well I'm painting all my callipers, replacing discs, pads, lines. The cling film over my reservoir didn't seal well enough so the fluid has dropped out, so I guess it will be me! Will hopefully have an answer end of next week.
Fingers crossed it will go well for you. However it would seem most people are wuite adamant that letting your resevoir run dry is a sure fire way to kill the ABS unit. I hope that's not the case, and you prove otherwise. Please, keep me updated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,314 Posts
Why? Surely the ABS stuff is free of fluid when initially fitted? Apparently bleeding with the key half turned solves this problem.
I have the complete set of hard copy manuals and within the relevant section it stresses, most emphatically, that there are dire consequences (and subsequent difficulties) if the ABS pump is allowed to have air in it.

If anyone would care to play Russian roulette with this one please let the rest of us know the result!
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top