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I have been offerred a 156 which has been subject to an insurance claim and has category D status on the HPI register. I know the seller and the history of this car and am happy to buy it, but my insurance company refused to insure it. Is there any reputable insurance company that will insure it for a reasonable premium?
 

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My 164 was a Cat D writeoff after I got hit my a BMW- it's just an uneconomical repair.

If the Insurance company won't insure it, probably it hasn't had it's Vehicle Identity Check - any VOSA station should be able to do it.
If it's been done, the V5 will say
'Accident damaged and/or substantially repaired; identity checked on ....'


BUT you may need to ask yourself why the seller is trying to sell it in an uninsureable condition rather than paying a little under £50 to make it insureable.

Also you need to be sure you know exactly what the damage was - it could easily be structural.


Tell him to get it VIC'd or no deal.
NB the VIC is not an MOT

If he refuses, something's wrong.

What's the price like? - I'd be looking for a hefty discount.
 

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Cat D do not need to be VIC'd...
 

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Cat D do not need to be VIC'd...

Maybe not, but I can only go by my experience & at the least my insurance co insisted I had it done before reinstating my insurance fully.

IIRC it's intended to prevent cut n shuts.
 

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Found this in a leaflet on the VOSA site:

"The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC)
was introduced on 7th April 2003 and makes car 'ringing' more
difficult.
From this date damaged cars must be notified to the Driver and
Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) if the cost of repair exceeds the
pre-accident value. Usually this takes place when an Insurer
decides to 'write off' a car, following an engineer's assessment of
the damage. These cars are given a VIC marker, which is a note
added to the DVLA computer record and as long as it remains on
the record, DVLA will not issue a replacement Registration
Certificate (V5C, commonly known as a log book) or Vehicle
Licence reminder (V11) for the car. The VIC marker will be
removed when the car passes a VIC. This means that its identity
has been confirmed by the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency
(VOSA). DVLA will then be able to issue a replacement V5C.
Remember: If you buy a car that has been 'written off' by an Insurer
it is likely that it will need a VIC even though the accident damage mayseem light. You can confirm that the car has a VIC marker, or if a
previous VIC has already been carried out, by telephoning VOSA on
08706060440. VOSA will only need to carry out a VIC once a VIC
marker has been set. If this has not happened, or if a VIC has already
been carried out, VOSA need not and cannot carry out a VIC.
When is a VIC needed?
If your car is involved in an accident and subsequently notified to
DVLA as 'written off' by an Insurer, but you decide to keep the car
to repair yourself, it may still get a VIC marker. You should still
have the V5C and you can legally drive the car as long as it is
licensed, has a valid MOT, is roadworthy, and you have appropriate
insurance cover. However, if a VIC marker is set, DVLA will not
issue you with a V11 or a new V5C if you should need a
replacement. This could cause you some inconvenience. VOSA's
advice is that you find out whether a VIC marker has been set by
telephoning VOSA on 0870 60 60 440. Then if there is a VIC
marker set, apply for a suitable date for the VIC to be carried out.
NOTE: If you buy a car without a V5C or that requires a VIC, you may not
be able to register or license the car until the car has passed a VIC."

It doesn't quite tie up with the definition of a Cat D writeoff - IIRC that can be a percentage of the market value, but at the least a significant number of Cat Ds would qualify
 
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