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Discussion Starter #1
What do you think are the up and coming career paths that you would dangle under the nose of a 21 years old lad, who although reasonably intelligent and capable, has decided to drop out of Uni as he had an extremely unhappy first year there (but passed the year) and is now feeling quite low about life, and himself.

He is reasonably computer literate, loves mountain biking, is a capable artist, has quite a keen sense of humour but frankly has become a bit withdrawn following his bad experience.

Come on guys and gals, give me some inspiration please, I need all the help I can get.

AlfaLincs
 

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Job centre clerk? That'll make him go back :lol:
 

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Hi mate,

what does he want to do? Does he want a career? Are his inner desires more emotive than goal-oriented? Does he aspire to the corporate world, or is his heart better suited to helping people and/or communities?

If he loves bikes, he loves the outdoors. If he's arty as well, he'll hate the stifling office/corporate politics nonsense. And what does he aspire to? If it's a huge house and a flash car, that'll determine much about where he should go; if it's fulfilling what's in his heart, then that could take him down a very different route in life. And at 21, he's still soooo young.

Intuition is needed here, just as much as cold logic, methinks.
 

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21 is not young IMHO.I was an officer and fighting a war at that age.He is a man,maybe younger than most of us,but still a man that deserves respect.Go with your gut feeling mate and never have any regrets:)
 

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21 is not young IMHO.I was an officer and fighting a war at that age.He is a man,maybe younger than most of us,but still a man that deserves respect.Go with your gut feeling mate and never have any regrets:)
That is a very good point. And very well put Garry :thumbs:
 

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Why don't you suggest to him he just gets a job which will give him some cash in his pocket for the moment while he decides what he really wants to do. Sometimes I think we put too much pressure on our children to set their whole career path out in front of them as soon as they leave school/ college or Uni. It may be that he has nothing in mind at the moment and that's what's making him down.

I have a friend whose son was being sponsored through Uni by a shipping company, but half way through realised he hated it. He dropped out much to his parents dismay, and got a job with a builder to tide him over. He soon realised that he absolutely loved it and that's what he's doing now - something he had never even thought about before.

It may be that he decides to go back to Uni in a few years, but whatever, just encourage him to do something which makes him happy :)
 

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What was his degree course in?

You can't blame the lad for dropping out. All that money for what? 8 hours a week teaching time? 12 hours a week? If I hadn't been so dull I should have got a weekend job during my last bout of full time education.

I hate to dump on Great British universities and former Polytechnics, but surely those paying customers should get something for their money? The piddly amount of time they get taught British degrees are starting to look like mail order ones.

I know a 2nd year who was really unimpressed with the way his course is run.

A bit of 'temping'?

Go and register with a few agencies and get as many varied jobs as possible? He'll probably get dumped on now and again, but if he gets enough exposure to different things perhaps he'll get some idea?


You can have a long list of qualifications, but without experience I don't think they are worth much.

If he is OK around computers and has an interest he could look at what he can find on the web and eBay he may be able to teach himself to get through the Cicso CCNA exam or the Microsoft MCP one? Sadly I think the new 2 part CCNA exam means £160 in exam fees and about £90 for the MCP one.

Just beware out of date material on eBay that was current a decade ago.

Perhaps AOers that have recently done the CCNA themselves can say whether this is a good idea?

If he's interested in computers teaching himself something as well as working part time or full time will be something to put on his CV and getting it may give him a sense of achievement?

Volunteering? Doing something with the local police? Meeting new people and doing new things would provide him with some different and new perspectives. People in the police have a few trades, a bit like the military but with dodging less bullets?


My brother crashed his degree first time around. I think it was living away from home for the first time, discovering women and in reality perhaps the course was too hard for him.

He started again back home, got a 1st or 2ii, but what made him was his sandwich year. He was the 3rd guy through the door of a start up so got loads of experience before his final year.

He wobbled a bit through a few jobs before managing to get a graduate entry scheme that has the opportunity to work and do a Masters. :) - He was doing OK, and still is but wobbling a bit with the bursting of the bubble.


He may well have the right idea not piling up lots of debt for something that may not be worth it. :)

A few little victories, and some new perspectives may help.
 
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My advice to anyone, pick something that interests and inspires you. Something that you actually enjoy getting out of bed in the morning to do.

A job that you hate, no matter how well paid, will grind you down and destroy you.
 
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I had a job '95-'98 that was like getting paid to do my hobby.
Mine is a bit like that now. (although keep it quiet, don't want my boss knowing that)

Jobs I'd rather do? :confused: Pilot. Astronaut. AC/DC Roadie. NASCAR Driver. I think that's all :lol:
 
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I had summat similar with my youngest lad he did complete Uni and got his degree but he hated every minute of it :(

I think he did this because he wanted me and Jan to be proud of him but it didn't matter a jot to us if he passed or failed we just wanted him to be happy :)

He started work two years ago with a large commodities Importer in Liverpool and he was forced down the route of academia again but this time was different, We all went out for a meal as treat for his birthday and had a few beers he got a bit toasty and emotional and told us he didn't want to go into the accontancy side and he had no interest in getting his ACCA and he wanted to be hands on and get more involved in the operations side of the business.

He's very ambitious but not for wealth or personal gain more like the ambition to be the best at what he does.

He's ben given that opportunity to do just that and hopes to attend cotton school for six months in Texas later this year :)

What I'm trying to say is why dangle a career to tempt him take him out sit down somewhere over a nice meal and maybe a few beers and talk find out what's in his head he might already know what he want's but hasn't had the opportunity to share his thoughts yet :)
 

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Whatever....don't end up in the construction industry....:D
I second that - pays well, in the right areas, but you get the brunt of god damn credit crunches!

Having a career crisis myself at mo - need to escape heavy civils!

Has he thought of going to America for a year to do Soccer training for under priveledged kids - my bro in law is doing it and god has he grown up! He's done 14 states and loves every minute..........
 
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I've only just refound my own thread,:rolleyes:

Some useful stuff for which thanks. We've suggested volunteering, an he did have a job at HMV..which did not go well. He's had interviews at Butlins, PC World (he got as far as 2nd interview)..other than that its been uphill to get him going.

Football is a no no. He hates it and has size 15 feet:rolleyes: Mind you Peter Crouch does OK.

I agree about finding something you enjoy doing. I've met more unhappy doctors/solicitors/accountants than I can shake a stick at. One of my friends from Uni who is a doctor now runs the local fruit/veg export market and the local airport where she lives in S.Africa. Half the work, same pay and she loves it:D

Alfalincs
 
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