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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I thought I'd share this with those of you who have upgraded cams. Obviously the usual disclaimers apply, but if you follow these instructions, you should experience no problems. You might have experienced a substantial loss of torque below 3000rpm when you installed your high-lift, increased duration cams. If you have 11mm and higher lift cams with 270 and above duration, your power band has shifted higher, coming ‘on cam’ at 3000 with a sustained rush to about 6 or 7500rpm.This thread is to help you regain torque at the bottom end using readily available tools.

You will need a long, thickish drinking straw, dirty cloth, a torch (to light up your pulley and pointer later), a spark plug spanner, some copper compound, 1 x 17, 2 x 10, 1 x 22, 2 x 8, 1 x 14 and 1 x 13 socket or spanner, a long-nose pliers, a really big pliers or gripping tool (to move the cam later) the cam timing template attached, a scissors, a cold engine, good light, a clip to replace the one you’ll be removing from the 8mm bolt and locking nut on the cam sprocket and about 1 hour (much quicker the second time around). You will need to put the car on level ground and have some rolling space. Cut the cam timing templates using the scissors (you’ll only need the exhaust one if you use my setting).

Remove the cam cover with the 17 and 10 spanners (start at two centre bolts and then the end bolts in diagonal order – the same way you would loosen a wheel). Put this aside and use the rag to wipe the oil from the cam cover surface and the cam cover gasket. Set these aside away from dust. Remove the #1 spark plug lead and plug with your spark plug spanner. Now put your car into 5th gear and disengage the handbrake. Go to the passenger side of the engine compartment. While holding the drinking straw, insert the straw into the # 1 plug hole and locate the top of the #1 piston dome. While on the passenger side, bend over the fender and slowly roll the car with your hand on the wheel arch until the straw reaches its highest point. The engine will now be in the TDC range. To verify the actual point of TDC, check the pulley at the front of the engine using your torch. The pointer should be lined up at the white mark and the intake and exhaust cam lobes at #1 should both be facing towards the right and left fenders respectively. The lobe centre cam markings should be lined up with the cam journal markings. This is the factory setting of 102 102 [99.5 99.5 for Euro cams caps] LC’s (lobe centres) which is optimal for 10548 Euro cams. Now pull your handbrake up and engage 1st gear. This is a weak cam locking technique, so you will have to recheck that the engine is at TDC later.

Turn your attention to the 8mm bolt and nut at the end of your exhaust sprocket. Be extremely careful now! Remove the metal split pin at the front of the 8mm locknut. Loosen the bolt-nut combo partially using your 8mm spanners. If this bolt and nut combo is facing the bottom of the engine, you will have to turn the engine over again until you can conveniently reach it. Now gently bend back the locktab on the 22mm nut on the cam sprocket and then loosen this nut slightly. Now place your dirty rag under the cam sprocket to provide cover so that the 8mm bolt-nut combo does not fall into the engine. Now remove the 8mm bolt-nut combo and place in a safe place. Your exhaust cam can now move freely. There is no need to remove the timing chain.

Now use your 13mm spanner to remove only the exhaust cam journal at #1 plug. Place your exhaust cam timing template on your cam journal and make a new mark at 104 or 106 (101.5 or 103.5 if Euro cam caps). This is the retarded setting which will improve exhaust gas scavenging and release some torque. Replace the journal with your 13mm spanner. Now using the text in italics in the 3rd paragraph, reset the engine to TDC. Using your big pliers (I use a water pump one), grab the cam between the sprocket and the exhaust cam journal at plug #1 and rotate the cam to line up with your new marking.

Insert the 8mm bolt-nut combo into the new cam sprocket hole (the cam sprockets are made so that you can only fully insert the 8mm bolt-nut combo into one hole. Make sure that your bolt-head is facing the front of the car. This will ensure that there is no chance that the bolt could work itself loose and fall into the engine. Now tighten and insert your split pin into the hole in the 8mm bolt. Now pat yourself on the back. The hard work is now done. Remove the dirty rag.

Retighten the 22mm nut at the end of the cam sprocket and bend back the locktab to lock the nut. Put engine at TDC. Tighten your cam chain with your 14 spanner by loosening the timing chain bolt (on the front of your head) slowly 1/8 turn at a time. Do this very slowly or you will have big problems trying to locate the timing tensioner wedge again. When you see the chain tighten (normally accompanied by a click), retighten the 14 bolt. Verify that the intake cam is at 102 [99.5 for Euro cams] and that the exhaust cam mark is at your new mark on the remarked cam journal. Your settings are now 102 106 [99.5 103.5] or 102 104 [99.5 101.5] (wherever you marked the exhaust cam).

Now engage 5th gear and push the car very slowly so that the engine completes two full rotations either way. There should be no strong resistance when pushing (obviously weak resistance because the car is in gear). If there is, stop pushing immediately! You have not followed the instructions to the letter. This is valve to piston interference. If there is no strong resistance, continue. If not, start over.

Clean the surface of the head with your rag. Apply copper compound to the mating surface where your cam cover gasket will be located and to the cam cover gasket on both sides. Put cam cover gasket and cam cover back on. Then retighten cam cover in order mentioned above. Your tappet settings will be slightly off, but will not make that much of a difference in terms of noise. More clearance (within limits) is better for engine life.

If your compression is good and you have no leaks from your valve stem seals, check your spark plugs. If they are not a nice tan colour, you can lean the mixture out a bit by an 1/8. You can always test this later again once you have done your first drive and adjust accordingly. If you are still running with the standard jetting on hot cams, setting for best idle will give you sooty plugs.

Now you can restart your engine. Clean plugs and synched, clean carbs will help a lot with start-up. Check that your timing is spot-on. You will notice quite a difference at the bottom end now that you’ve tinkered with the brains of your engine. Remember, torque wins races and saves fuel. Enjoy responsibly:D!
 

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great stuff EL...this goes onto my database.

I'm sure a lot of guys will find this handy. :thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Shot, PO. I'm not sure how much can be applied to your engine, Mystic. I don't know the Ts as intimately.
 

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just as a matter of interest el, to turn the engine over wouldn't it be better to jack the driver side up and leave the front passenger wheel on the ground(so it will only be the front right wheel in the air), engage 5th gear and then rotate the drivers wheel to turn the motor....reason I ask is because this is how it's done on the TS motors???
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Rear wheel drive and LSD for my car so I'd probably have to jack up both rear wheels, but it would be a bit difficult to keep my eye on the pulley and turn the rear wheel! Maybe we can all post simple tech advice?
 

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DAMN El...the resident NORD Guru - and AlfaFEmale and Mystic and Purple are our resident TS guru's...damn we are spoilt for choice!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'd like to thank the maccies who did 3 engine builds (George 2 and Chico 1) and f....d it up, for inadvertently advancing my expensive Nord education. Also a shoutout to my new maccie, Jeremy at Carsport Holland - 5.5k+km's so far for no-smoke, change at 8000rpm, leave hopped-up Citis in Italian exhaust fumes fun!
 

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good point el, I honestly forgot that your cab is a rear wheel drive which definitely changes everything.
 
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Thanks for the post El. I didn't have the time to apply this to my cams this weekend, but will definitely have a go at it this coming weekend. Looking forward to some much needed torque. :thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No prob, dude. Thought I might as well post a printable version for everyone to consult. Just paying it forward!
 

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hey ppls speaking of Nords ill be looking for a Nord 2l engine int the near future my 2l is very pap now so it needs to be replaced...i have a complete redone 2l head at home so ill be putting that on the proposed 2l in the future...so who knows someone who knows someone who has a Nord for me?And where do I get hot cams El?
 
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Hey Guili, I had my cams manufactured at Master Cams here in Cape Town. The guy there, Malcolm, I think it is used to rally with Giulietta's back in the day.
 

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just as a matter of interest el, to turn the engine over wouldn't it be better to jack the driver side up and leave the front passenger wheel on the ground(so it will only be the front right wheel in the air), engage 5th gear and then rotate the drivers wheel to turn the motor....reason I ask is because this is how it's done on the TS motors???
Rear wheel drive and LSD for my car so I'd probably have to jack up both rear wheels, but it would be a bit difficult to keep my eye on the pulley and turn the rear wheel! Maybe we can all post simple tech advice?
Why dont you park the car in N with the hand brake up.. then take a 36 socket and turn the motor on the crank... Much more accurate and you can watch the straw right in front of you, and you can make sure you turning the motor clockwise as not to get a chain backlash error.

@ EL. what does the 102 104 ect mean? is it degrees or what? and what are the markings on the cams referenced to?

Good Post though!!
I've done cam timing before but never knew about the templates and (102 104 106...) numbers..
 

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Why dont you park the car in N with the hand brake up.. then take a 36 socket and turn the motor on the crank... Much more accurate and you can watch the straw right in front of you, and you can make sure you turning the motor clockwise as not to get a chain backlash error.

@ EL. what does the 102 104 ect mean? is it degrees or what? and what are the markings on the cams referenced to?

Good Post though!!
I've done cam timing before but never knew about the templates and (102 104 106...) numbers..
This is how my dad did it back in the day when he still struggled with Nords, lol now the guy plays with Busso's and don't even know where the intake is LOL!

AR156...how much for the cams?
 
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Cams plus port, gasflow, new valve seats/springs/shims and what not came to R6500.

Cams were R4250. But they were mos billets and so he did cut them according to what I had spec'd. I took the profile out of the 'Performance tuning alfa twin cam engines' - or something to that effect, magazine.

Wanted 310's, settled for 288's.
 

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So hows it drive now as opposed to stock?R6500 hell no yaarrrrre...That's a 2cnd hand engine!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Guili, 11.4mm lift 276 cams can be had for just above R3k. The difference in power is good, but be prepared for carbon fouling on plugs, a slight loss of low-end grunt, but a nice linear progression from 3K to 6.5K.
Trackman, 102 104 refers the cam lobe centres in degrees. And I quote: "The opening and closing process of an inlet or exhaust valve as controlled by a cam lobe constitutes a complete event in the cycle of the engine. Like any event, it has a beginning and an end. Naturally, then it also has a middle or center. The location of this center in relation to the rotational position of the crankshaft is known as the lobe." Standard lobe centres are marked at 102 102 on the Euro carb Nord's.
Jaxx, you bet your arsch it's a great drive!
The idea was to provide a tech tip to the guy whose toolbox is not quite as comprehensive as the garage's, but still allows relatively good results. Apparently moving from one camshaft sprocket hole to the next is approximately 1.5 degrees.
Normally one would go heavy on the intake cam and less hot on the exhaust to retain some torque, but I'm not going to be the guinea pig for that! Not sure what the wisdom in SA is on big valves, but I've been led to believe that bigger valves are more obstructive in terms of flow than the standard valves and are not worth it in slightly modified motors. That said, again it seems that if you are going bigger, then only intake is better.
AR156, wouldn't 310 have bogged you down in traffic?
So who's posting the next layman's tech tip?
 
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Guili, ever seen a 2.0 n/a coming at you sideways?! Power is phenomenal, but would be since stock is kind of sleepy. I think Malcolm had the cam timing set perfectly which is why it had so much krag. Now, it is under performing a bit as I've blown a couple of headgaskets since it's initial install, and the okes who put the head back together obviously set it back at the correct mark. Oh, I don't apply the power too much from the outset any more these days either - couplings are expensive :cry:.
Gonna thread jack for a second, but a guy here in Kensington machined his own couplings - guaranteed to never break - but sadly I don't know where he is any more. :(
 
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