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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to dismantle my brakes soon, to overhaul the calipers and replace the hoses. Obviously I'll have to bleed the entire hydraulic system afterwards.

Is there a recommended way to do the brakes? I remember I saw or read something that said they had to be bled in a certain wheel order.

What about the clutch?

Ralf S.
 
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Brakes are, as a rule of thumb, bled from the furthest point from the reservoir first.

So, osr, nsr, osf and then nsf is the order. The manual contradicts this I think but ignore that!

Get yaself either a willing assistant or a self-bleeding kit (note: that is not a stanley knife!). The one I have is not great but it works, main gripe is the seal ot the reservoir which I've had to play about with to stop fluid flying all over the place!

Never done a clutch but it's basically the same principle.

If you need more detailed instruction ask away....you might want to consider blocking the brake lines when the calipers are off to prevent air getting in/fluid getting out as 155s are a right pain to bleed once a serious amount of air has got inside.....ask me how I know :mad:

wrinx
 

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I suggest you get yourself a willign helper, it doesnt even have to be a man, just simple communication to synchronise the procedure is required and the job is done in munites where bleeding is concerned.

Doing the bleeding by yourself will take alot of time and running around, its really not worth the hassle, when you can offer someone a beer to get the job done in minutes ;)

Hum :)
 

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The approach I'd take is to do the calipers one at a time, bleeding the system after each. It's a little bit more time-consuming, but better than trying to bleed the whole system at once - you do at least know where the problem is!

Before you disconnect any of the hydraulics, take the cap off the fluid reservoir, cover the top of the reservoir with cling film or similar & then replace the cap. This will block off the air hole in the cap - if air can't get in, there's less likelihood of fluid running out.

Before taking a caliper off, clamp the flexible hose to stop fluid running out - as it appears you are replacing the hoses you'll have to take them off, but if you leave the old ones in place until you're ready to put everything back together you reduce the time the system is open to a minimum, so there's less time for fluid to run out. If you're not reusing the flexibles, any clamp will do; if you're reusing them, use a proper brake hose clamp - some people will recommend against clamping hoses, but I must say it's never caused me any problems......

As for bleeding, I use a Gunsons Eezibleed (yes, wrinx, I've had the seal problem!).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cool. Sounds like it's not tooooo tricky.

Any info' on the clutch? I suppose it won't need bleeding, as there shouldn't be any air getting into that part of the system.

But I'll have the calipers off for a while.. they rears have been sticking, so I'm going to put in new seals and clean the moving parts up.. there's a chance that most of the fluid will run out in that time. :)

Ralf S.
 
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