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At any given time, I usually have a 'song of the moment'. This is a song which has grabbed my attention, and for a short period I can happily listen to again and again. Sometimes it's a song that's new to me. But often it's an old one that's just been heard again and reminded me of it.

This thread is for the purpose of sharing those songs - when I remember and can be bothered - without having to find some other pretext to do so. It will be updated sporadically if at all.

To try to add at least a little interest to others, I will try to share a fact related to the song - either something I know, or I'll look something up.

The song of the moment currently is this classic:

And the fact:
Little Richard's previous hit was Tutti Frutti. This was covered much more successfully by Pat Boone almost immediately after release, because in the 50's America was so racist that a large part of the population simply would not buy a song by a black person. Beggars belief, doesn't it?
Anyway, LTS was specifically designed to be so upbeat and be sung so quickly that Boone wouldn't be able to cover it (although I believe more as a joke than anything else). Of course Boone covered it anyway - his career at the time was re-recording black songs for a white audience.
 

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So the thread isn't empty, I'll add some old songs of the moment I recall right away.

Here's one - and it's a cover (gasp), which I prefer to the original (double gasp):

Irritatingly, it's actually really hard to find this version now, because they've since released the song on their latest album, and that version (which is nowhere near as good) is all you usually get when you search for "Foo Fighters Have a Cigar". While trying to find it for this thread I have found the secret is to search for either Mission Impossible or for Brian May (who plays guitar on this version).

Erm, regarding the fact - pick something out of everything I just said. The Brian May thing maybe.
 

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And here's the other one which springs to mind. It might even be the first song that I concsiously realised was a 'song of the moment', as I had a conversation with a friend about it. It's also freaking awesome.


I first heard this not knowing who it was, and was asked to guess. I said it sounded like a cross between Santana and Chris Rea, so I was half right.

My fact plan has gone to crap because I can't find anything to put about this one.
 

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Little Richard's previous hit was Tutti Frutti. This was covered much more successfully by Pat Boone almost immediately after release, because in the 50's America was so racist that a large part of the population simply would not buy a song by a black person. Beggars belief, doesn't it?
Only in recent times did I learn that sixties English bands (the Stones for example) organised for Mississippi and Chicago blues men to visit Europe, where they were astonished to be allowed to perform to white audiences. They influenced the British groups, who influenced the US white musicians. In a shed behind a Hammersmith pub, I saw Big Boy Arthur Crudup sit on a rickety chair and play his acoustic guitar. Never made the connection to Elvis's "That's All Right" - mainly because in my clique no-one listened to Elvis.

All things are complicated, of course, and the history of music is of adaptation of earlier forms. So there's nothing intrinsically wrong with "white men playing the blues." But yes, the prejudice that's existed within our own lifetimes is quite incredible.
 

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in the 50's America was so racist that a large part of the population simply would not buy a song by a black person. Beggars belief, doesn't it?
Yes, and imagine being a black woman back then - double whammy discrimination.
This 4 years before Elvis's cover:

and involved with this recording was band leader Johnny Otis.
Put his name into your search engine of choice and a whole universe of great music will unfold. (not least, his talented son Shuggie Otis)
In the UK blues scene, John Mayall played a similar role (perhaps not quite so impressive) as a conduit for talented musicians. Eric Clapton, Fleetwood Mac, Mick Taylor (Rolling Stones guitarist) all played in his band the Bluesbreakers.

Peter Green (of the original Fleetwood Mac) had some serious mental health issues, tied up with drug use and guilt resulting from the amount of money he made from blues music (In 1969 Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac sold more records than the Beatles and the Rolling Stones combined) while its (black) originators remained for the most part impoverished and unrecognised.

Green recorded this song, illustrating his increasing mental torment.
Soon afterwards he retired from music for some decades, and instructed his management to redirect any profits from his royalties to black blues musicians who had originated the music he had been so successful playing.
 

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Frank Zappa at his best, make sure you listen on a system capable of bass, so you can appreciate the fantastic bass playing of 16 year old Shuggie Otis. :cool:(y)
 

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All things are complicated, of course, and the history of music is of adaptation of earlier forms. So there's nothing intrinsically wrong with "white men playing the blues." But yes, the prejudice that's existed within our own lifetimes is quite incredible.
Oh yeah, nothing wrong with it at all.

Someone refusing to listen to a song because it's by a black artist though - there's a lot wrong with that!

Not that we're past such behaviour. There was a clip online recently of a woman voting for their representative and then finding out he was gay and demanding to be able to change her vote. The woman speaking to her had the patience of a saint.
 

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Spotify has been playing the extended studio version of (Don't Fear) The Reaper to me in recent weeks. I have gone from having never heard the instrumental break in the middle of the song before to it being about my favourite part of it.

Start's at about 2:30:
 
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