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Foods to avoid....Oily fish- anchovies, herring, mackerel, sardines, sprats, whitebait

Sardines and mackerel are definitely more evident in my diet lately.

... rapid loss of weight can increase uric acid levels and trigger painful gout attack

I've lost weight quite quickly, but not crash dieting.

Foods that are ok for gout.....?

Low purine foods•Dairy- milk, cheese, yoghurt, butter•Eggs•Bread and cereals- (except wholegrain)•Pasta and noodles•Fruit and vegetables

It'sa bliddy MINEFIELD
 

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This is an interesting article which summaries a recent study about gout & diet, I found it when talking to a friend of mine who has gout in one of his big toes. He's only 26 but he is a big lad with a terrible diet (whole 500g pack of dried pasta cooked in one go with a jar of cheese sauce or pesto is a particular favourite - over 2000cals right there), he is probably pre-diabetic / insulin-resistant and the inflammation/gout symptoms could be coming from that. Funnily enough he is mostly vegetarian also, and has been for a while to try and help with the gout.. I'm trying to suggest to him that the huge carb feasts and resultant blood sugar/insulin spikes with very little real nutrition could be a big part of the problem.

Sounds like a more complex health situation than I can comment on. I did have a look at the link and I'm sure a lot of people find reassurance there.
I however tend towards the UK Arthritis and Gout health advice. Seems thoughtful and I sort of go along with the logic. I followed the advice I found there, along with the downloadable list of commmon foods and their respective protein to Purine levels therefore Uric acid levels. It may just be happenstance, but by avoiding high Purine foods and moderating others I have managed to stay free of Gout attacks for about a year and a half now.
What uber pisses me off too, is that my GP failed to diagnose the contition, or at least tell me about it for a long time. If I had known, I would have rung the changes sooner and had thereby less Arthritic damage to the toe joint.
 

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Foods to avoid....Oily fish- anchovies, herring, mackerel, sardines, sprats, whitebait

Sardines and mackerel are definitely more evident in my diet lately.

... rapid loss of weight can increase uric acid levels and trigger painful gout attack

I've lost weight quite quickly, but not crash dieting.

Foods that are ok for gout.....?

Low purine foods•Dairy- milk, cheese, yoghurt, butter•Eggs•Bread and cereals- (except wholegrain)•Pasta and noodles•Fruit and vegetables

It'sa bliddy MINEFIELD
It is a minefield, even more so for me and others following my diet as most medical advice on what foods to eat, what foods to avoid is based on studies involving people who were starting out with the standard diet and then adding in extra X or reducing Y and monitoring the changes against a control group. Very few studies have been done on the effects of more or less food X/Y in people who are eating almost no refined carbohydrates, and so have consistently low blood glucose, low insulin & high glucagon almost 24/7. You do have to be a bit more 'on it' with what you're eating, I keep a food diary and try and track nutrients. I'm a big fan of statistics, numbers and trends so it actually brings me great pleasure :LOL:

Maybe try swapping the mackerel and sardines for salmon, haddock, trout. Although I would have thought salmon might have had high purine content as it is a fatty fish, full of omega 3. But if its not on the list, it must not do.
 

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I think salmon & trout also apply - but I'm just going to depend on 'moderation in all things' and hope for the best. Keeping up with the rules is problematic if it becomes all-consuming - the game stops being fun.

In other news, 2 lbs has shifted after sticking for a week and a bit.

Various people have noticed the weight loss and are now engaging in the various levels of semi-insulting observations that must necessarily be made, before diverting the convo back to them. I've asked them to stop insulting my semi.
 

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Well done for going in the right direction. I seem to remember from somewhere that the reason you can get a Gout flare up when losing weight is that the metabolising of the fat as you lose it, puts purines in your blood as if you had eaten meat. If you feel a flare up coming get the Naproxen on it straight away.
 

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I think salmon & trout also apply - but I'm just going to depend on 'moderation in all things' and hope for the best. Keeping up with the rules is problematic if it becomes all-consuming - the game stops being fun.

In other news, 2 lbs has shifted after sticking for a week and a bit.

Various people have noticed the weight loss and are now engaging in the various levels of semi-insulting observations that must necessarily be made, before diverting the convo back to them. I've asked them to stop insulting my semi.
(y) You will plateau from time to time with the weight loss - its standard procedure. Even on very low calorie diets or even outright fasting, the scale's needle can stay firmly stuck to a specific point sometimes for upto a couple of weeks. As you diet and the fat cells start to empty, the body replaces some of the withdrawn fat for water to keep the structure of the cell, the idea being that before too long you will have some excess calories which can be stored back in that cell and the water can come out again. But at some point when the fat cell has very little fat left in it, it is no longer viable, the body decides to recycle it in its entirety, thus releasing the water. Its why you sometimes see big fluctuations in weight, although actual fat loss tends to be more gradual.

I've noticed women try to be a bit more polite about it, "you look good, have you lost a bit of weight?" and from blokes its "Christ, where's the other half of you gone?"
 

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This is an interesting article which summaries a recent study about gout & diet, I found it when talking to a friend of mine who has gout in one of his big toes. He's only 26 but he is a big lad with a terrible diet (whole 500g pack of dried pasta cooked in one go with a jar of cheese sauce or pesto is a particular favourite - over 2000cals right there), he is probably pre-diabetic / insulin-resistant and the inflammation/gout symptoms could be coming from that. Funnily enough he is mostly vegetarian also, and has been for a while to try and help with the gout.. I'm trying to suggest to him that the huge carb feasts and resultant blood sugar/insulin spikes with very little real nutrition could be a big part of the problem.

Thanks Pud, I too can be rather heavy with my carbs, so I ought to investigate the Ketogenic diet.

That article was useful and it linked to another article, which others might find useful (link below) and mentions cherries. I have been drinking cherry juice since I was diagnosed (last April I think) and that, combined with a more moderate approach to alcohol consumption and drinking water has limited my attacks recently.

 

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Thanks Pud, I too can be rather heavy with my carbs, so I ought to investigate the Ketogenic diet.

That article was useful and it linked to another article, which others might find useful (link below) and mentions cherries. I have been drinking cherry juice since I was diagnosed (last April I think) and that, combined with a more moderate approach to alcohol consumption and drinking water has limited my attacks recently.

You're much better off eating fruit & drinking water than drinking fruit juice. Fruit is full of fibre and digests slowly, fruit juice has no fibre and the fructose goes straight to your liver almost immediately rather than being slow release. Your body can't do anything with fructose until it is first processed by the liver, just like alcohol. I never knew about the benefits of cherries, I'll mention it to my mate.
 

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Is 207/101 bad?



Asking for a friend.
Do you have any more details? There should be a count for LDL, a count for HDL, a count for triglycerides and a total. Some tests break down the LDL into various sub-categories too.
 

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Well this is a cheerful old thread isn't it!!? The day I start whinging about all my health issues (none yet....but only 53)….. let alone doing it on a public forum.....will be the day I realise that I really am old and have nothing better to talk about!! My mum talks about little else.....Im not going to be like that!
 

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Is 207/101 bad?



Asking for a friend.
That would be considered a hypertensive crisis, needing immediate medical advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #138
Well this is a cheerful old thread isn't it!!? The day I start whinging about all my health issues (none yet....but only 53)….. let alone doing it on a public forum.....will be the day I realise that I really am old and have nothing better to talk about!! My mum talks about little else.....Im not going to be like that!
In my own defence as thread starter - I specifically said that was about bad numbers. It is definitely not a "my old aches and pains" thread - despite what a few have posted.

My intention was to build an Alfaowner frankenstein composite of record blood pressures, cholesterol counts, lung capacities, wheezy asthma puffers, plummeting blood platelets and any other assorted extreme readings for health stats.

However. I've lost interest in that now.
 

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That's a blood pressure, not a cholesterol, Pud.
Wow OK, is 101 your resting heart rate? Seems pretty high. I was thinking it was an LDL/HDL ratio.
 
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