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Check these new items, adjustable cam pulleys and we have developed a new tensioner that uses one of the fixed idlers

These are being used on the latest 3.8 we are building

Ned
 

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Like the idea of a non-**** tensioner, but what do adjustable pulleys do for you?

Adjustable pulleys make it very easier to adjust the cam timing set amounts either direction to gain horsepower from different timing or while fitting non standard performance derived cams

now while the standard pulleys are fully adjustable as they have no key way it would be a major pain in the arse to keep re timing a car with dial gauges etc while doing a rolling road tuning session etc. also useful if once installed your adding other modifications at a later date etc..

dont add performance but allow you to extract performance lost by getting camshaft timing correct for the parts you have installed for performance
 

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Adjustable pulleys make it very easier to adjust the cam timing set amounts either direction to gain horsepower from different timing or while fitting non standard performance derived cams

now while the standard pulleys are fully adjustable as they have no key way it would be a major pain in the arse to keep re timing a car with dial gauges etc while doing a rolling road tuning session etc. also useful if once installed your adding other modifications at a later date etc..

dont add performance but allow you to extract performance lost by getting camshaft timing correct for the parts you have installed for performance
Like the look and sound of this. What price for the set?

Cheers
Allan
 

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Please excuse my ignorance but what are the differences / advantages between this and the standard tensioner? I'll be looking to get my cambelt changed soon (most probably at your Penrith branch) so am looking at my options.
 

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Like the idea of a non-**** tensioner
I've just finished replacing the cambelt, tensioner & idlers on a GTA today, the tensioner has only been on the car 14 months. Something in the backing plate has gone allowing the spring to half come out and the pulley wheel slide back in towards the engine, making the belt rub. So a non-schitt tensioner sounds pretty appealing!
 

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I've just finished replacing the cambelt, tensioner & idlers on a GTA today, the tensioner has only been on the car 14 months. Something in the backing plate has gone allowing the spring to half come out and the pulley wheel slide back in towards the engine, making the belt rub. So a non-schitt tensioner sounds pretty appealing!
One of the Alfa GT register in the eastern states (Australia) had a cambelt go bang in only a few months after replaceing, this could be the cause they could not find.

Allan
 

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Check these new items, adjustable cam pulleys and we have developed a new tensioner that uses one of the fixed idlers

These are being used on the latest 3.8 we are building

Ned
The tensioner looks very good. Keep us informed as to when they will be available.
 

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I've just finished replacing the cambelt, tensioner & idlers on a GTA today, the tensioner has only been on the car 14 months. Something in the backing plate has gone allowing the spring to half come out and the pulley wheel slide back in towards the engine, making the belt rub. So a non-schitt tensioner sounds pretty appealing!
Hi Dan i might be wrong but that sounds like my GTA haha :)
Tensioner only been fitted 10months! (only 8 of those it was actually driven) ;)

To say i am not happy about a tensioner failing would be an understatement after soo little time fitted. I will say that i will never fit one of those tensioners ever again. (pictures may follow!)
It should put my mind at rest that an OE part is now fitted
 
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Is there any evidence to suggest it could increase the service intervals?
Without conducting alot of engine testing this would be very hard to judge indeed.

I work for Gates Power Transmission who originally designed the cam drive system for these engines.
Thousands of motored and fired engine testing is conducted which is then finally proved in actual vehicle testing.
An automatic tensioner works by having an adjustable rate spring with its own damping characterisitcs and its own adjusting and working arm. These design points are quite critical.
Unfortunately if these parts are copied poorly they can lead to failure.
The automatic tensioner helps keep the tension in an operating window.

However a fixed tensioner, which this appears to be works in a completely different way. The fact that it can only be tensioned for installation. Then is left. It does look like it will take up all the tolerance of stack up etc with the adjuster. But it will not control the dynamics in the same way e.g. thermal expansion of the engine will cause the engine to grow, the automatic tensioner can take this into account, but a fixed tensioner cannot! This will cause a rise in system tension, but also the tension levels will fluctuate alot more than standard system.

Fixed tensioners tend to be used more on motorsport applications where timing intervals are alot shorter and maybe checked more often.
 

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Whilst the idea of a more robust tensioner sounds appealing, I don't think that a fixed tensioner (which the photos in the OP appear to show) is a viable solution. If it was, surely Fiat would have done this themselves, as it would be even cheaper than the piece of junk they did in fact use.
A fixed tensioner does no tallow for the considerable expansion that occurs with an all-aluminium engine like this, and will likely result in excessive belt noise, increased wear and reduced belt life.
I've been down this road before; 20 years ago with the old 12V Busso and it's infamous hydraulic tensioner. A fixed tensioner was not considered suitable for road cars then, and I doubt it will be for the 24V now. Fiat's solution to the 12V problem was to use a dynamic mechanical tensioner (similar in principle to the 24V), as well as changing the profile of the belt teeth and pulleys.
The tensioner design used on the 164 24V was better in my opinion, but they could be tricky to set, and of course were more expensive to manufacture.
 
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