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Discussion Starter #1
Yeah I know there are a few threads that mention AG's Lifeshine 'system' and debate its merits, but I have a specific question.

Long story short - I recently bought a 159 that I paid to have the Lifeshine treatment done, and one of the reasons I am doubtful as to whether it was done is that there are still tar spots in all the usual places (lower doors, sills, rear bumper).

Does anyone know if the proper way to apply this treatment includes the removal on any contaminants like tar spots? I would have thought if the idea was to apply a long lasting protective finish, they would recommend at least giving it a quick go with tar remover first :rolleyes:

Thanks in anticipation :thumbs:
 

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Yeah I know there are a few threads that mention AG's Lifeshine 'system' and debate its merits, but I have a specific question.

Long story short - I recently bought a 159 that I paid to have the Lifeshine treatment done, and one of the reasons I am doubtful as to whether it was done is that there are still tar spots in all the usual places (lower doors, sills, rear bumper).

Does anyone know if the proper way to apply this treatment includes the removal on any contaminants like tar spots? I would have thought if the idea was to apply a long lasting protective finish, they would recommend at least giving it a quick go with tar remover first :rolleyes:

Thanks in anticipation :thumbs:
The short answer is yes, all surface contamination should have been removed first.

Ideally the whole car should have had tar remover, fallout remover and then clayed otherwise the Lifeshine can't properly bond with the paint and it will also trap corrosive iron contaminants which, over time, will cause long term damage.
I always tell customers never to bother with this stuff from a dealer because their valeting departments are generally required to rush several cars through a day and re-use dirty cloths, wash mitts/sponges and don't observe the correct curing times. They also frequently under use the product (i.e. they use a pack designed for one car on two or three cars but charge each customer for a full treatment).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Tommy, great reply, ie exactly what I thought! :D

I knew it was a bit of a gamble getting them to do it but thought if it did add some protection for the first few months (inside & out) it would be worth it as I was collecting the car one day then going away in it on holiday the next, so no time to do any waxing myself.

Can I ask also, on the tar spots, do they normally appear only in warm weather, when the road is softer, as opposed to colder, wetter weather?

Just wondering if these spots are likely to have appeared during my first week of ownership, which was about 375 miles driving on cold and damp roads :confused:

If the answer is yes, only during warmer weather, then the tar spots must have been on there when I collected it (shame on me for not checking :rolleyes:)

Thanks :)
 

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Yes and no to be honest. Tar is certainly more common during the warmer months due to it being softer but you can also collect spots during the winter or colder months. Usually from roadworks and things of that nature.

I will add that any protection is better than no protection, its just a shame that dealers rarely apply these products properly because they valet cars in volume. It's easy enough to remove and re-apply properly if you want to stick with it. There are also loads of other equally good, if not better, products out there at a fraction of the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok thanks. I'll see what they have to say next time I take the car back them, this Friday.

At risk of invalidating whatever 'warranty' that Lifeshine product is supposed to have :lol:.... I have already removed the tar from the front passenger door (Auto Glym tar remover), polished it (AG Super Resin Polish), then applied a coat of G3 wax G3 SuperGloss Paste Wax - G3 Pro that I bought last year.

The difference between this door an the others, that still have tar spots and goodness knows what else, needless to say is like chalk and cheese.
 

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The tar remover probably stripped the Lifeshine where you used it. The SRP and G3 will just sit on top of it though.
Usually if I want a long term wax product I use Soft99 Fusso. It's a brilliant product especially for around £20 and can last up to a year with a single application.
 

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Tommy, what wax would you recommend for a white Giulietta, one of the 'best' available. Someone recommended King of Gloss.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The tar remover probably stripped the Lifeshine where you used it. The SRP and G3 will just sit on top of it though.
Usually if I want a long term wax product I use Soft99 Fusso. It's a brilliant product especially for around £20 and can last up to a year with a single application.

Thanks Tommy,
Agree about the tar remover removing the Lifeshine, and the SRP & wax just sitting on top..... but that's assuming there is any Lifeshine on there. It certainly doesn't feel like it and the rain/water doesn't bead any more than it would after a conventional wash.

I'll look into that Soft99 wax when I need to get a replacement for the G3.
 

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Have a look at nipponshine.com they're the only official UK importers of Soft99 products and the guy that runs it is a top bloke (Jackie Wong). If you want a long term wax then go for Fusso Coat, if you want a lot of gloss go for King Of Gloss.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank again Tommy. I'll bear those in mind :)


Back on the subject of my original question tho, I have a bit of an update....


In preparation for my visit back to where the Lifeshine was supposed to have been done, I did my own test and squirted water on the door that I had done myself (tar removal, SRP & G3 wax) and on the adjacent door that (should have) just had the lifeshine on. There was definite difference between the 2 ie the water on the front door that I had done beaded a lot more than the rear door.
I also squirted some water on the rear seat, on the alcantara, and it just soaked straight in; no beads whatsoever, as suggested there should be by the AutoGlym bumpf :rolleyes:

Back at the garage, they were fairly sure it had been done but accepted I wasn't happy so they redid the Lifeshine anyway. When I went back to pick it up, sure enough it did feel a lot smoother.... on the easy to reach surfaces :rolleyes: It did look like they hadn't buffed off all the wax/finish properly as it was still a bit greasy in places, and you could see smears where you ran your fingers across the paint, but at least they had appeared to have put something on there this time.

But in the heat of the moment, I forgot to ask whether they had done the interior :eek:

Back home tho, I ran my hand along the lower part of the rear door, next to the one I had done, and it was still a bit rough in places as there are still tar spots there, but not on the door I cleaned last weekend :mad:

Oh well, looks like i'll have to do it myself, again...
 
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The short answer is yes, all surface contamination should have been removed first.

Ideally the whole car should have had tar remover, fallout remover and then clayed otherwise the Lifeshine can't properly bond with the paint and it will also trap corrosive iron contaminants which, over time, will cause long term damage.
I always tell customers never to bother with this stuff from a dealer because their valeting departments are generally required to rush several cars through a day and re-use dirty cloths, wash mitts/sponges and don't observe the correct curing times. They also frequently under use the product (i.e. they use a pack designed for one car on two or three cars but charge each customer for a full treatment).
I used to be in the valeting job working for Lexus UK, we used to sell supaguard to customers yet make one pack last for two cars. I was never happy with this practice so i jacked it in but yes it still goes on and is a huge con as it returns big profits to the valeters.
 

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I used to be in the valeting job working for Lexus UK, we used to sell supaguard to customers yet make one pack last for two cars. I was never happy with this practice so i jacked it in but yes it still goes on and is a huge con as it returns big profits to the valeters.
Precisely why I refuse to work for dealers. One I spoke to expected 4 cars an hour! (that's not just sales, but things like services too). No wonder they scratch cars, leave holograms and buffer trails and generally do a poor job.
I generally quite 6-8hrs for a pre-sale valet/detail, more if it requires machine polishing/correcting.
 
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