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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

As the title says really...
I've got £350 to spend from a cycle to work scheme. I don't want anything fancy just something to get me to and from the railway station about 15min cycle away on road and a bit of park path. I have been looking at hybrids and have narrowed them to 3 based on nothing more than budget and looks. I know nothing about spec's... This is where I hope some of you guys will jump in...

So which one shall I get...

#1 - Fuji Traverse 1.5
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/fuji/traverse-15-2013-hybrid-bike-ec041893

#2 - Mongoose Crossway 150 2013
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/mongoose/crossway-150-2013-hybrid-bike-ec042772

#3 (The wild card because it is a Mountin bike) Jamis Trail X2 2013
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/jamis/trail-x2-2013-mountain-bike-ec041450

I think the Mongoose looks the best but can't find any reviews on it. The Fuji has got good write ups and the Jamis has been recommended by a cyclist friend. I've tried to compare specs but I ain't a clue.

What are peoples opinions?

I'm happy to consisder other recommendations. Baring in mind the mind the £350 yas to get me a bike & helmet.
 

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On looks alone, the Jamis.

It's got disk brakes.

Leaves you £40 for a good helmet.

Reviewer said:
I purchased this bike as part of a Ride-To-Work Scheme in work and it is has been excellent since day one. The main use I have for it is cycling to and from work which isn't very far (maybe a two mile round trip), but I also use it for weekend cycles and running around town.
The ride is very smooth, the saddle is a little hard but I think that could just be me getting used to cycling in general as I never really did too much of it for a long time. The brakes are excellent, even in wet weather and it even comes with a handy bell to warn pedestrians to get out of the way! It is excellent value for money and I would highly reccomend this bike for urban commuting and weekend leisure cycles.
 

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The Jamis one looks really nice but if you're only riding on roads the hybrids are a better bet. I switched from MTB to hybrid last year and was really surprised at how much easier to ride the hybrid was on the road.
 
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Like above the Jamis is the better option.

The shimano gears arent going to chew like much cheaper variants, cant go wrong with that sort of spec.

I have had a 6061 alu frame in the past and they are very robust and really strong. (have up graded the spec).

Tektro brakes are fine, can get higher spec but for road use it would be pointless.

The frame looks familiar, like an old Giant blueprint or a Kona... Not sure.. But for the money you cannot go wrong.

Just ensure you get a good lid... There are plenty of good bike shops out there. You may come to realise that some shop workers are cyclists and are ignorant or rude but bite your tounge, they are full of advice :)

Have been cycling for years, more Downhill sections and cross country.

:D

The Fuji Trav -- Is an old Giant frame, which is a really good frame... but it is a close call with both bikes, one has disks which are far more effective and much safer to use but the Fuji has little bits that are slightly better yet made pointless by other cheap components........... Go with the Jamis.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This would have been my first choice
http://www.mangoletsi.com/parts-shop/view/12523-alfa-romeo-touring-bike-black.html
...if Mangolesti were only part of the cycle scheme!

But thanks for the above advice.
Looking at the spec of the Jamis & Fuji would there be much 'on the road' difference? I notice they are the same weight and I can put slicker tyres on the Jamis. But other then that, is there anything else which governs better road use?
 
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Ha nice :D

Not a lot to be honest, other than the shimano gearing being much quicker and less chance of the gears slipping all the time... Give the bike about a month or two and let all the cables find there way home and have the bike retuned, you will have a top road bike. The only thing to improve would be a lighter rim and a smoother tread tyre. It is amazing how much weight tyres and rims add, but they are sort of essential :lol:. I wouldnt think about them just yet, see how you get on with what ever bike you get, if you feel that something can be improved then start to spend a little...

I would suggest looking at 29er bikes (just a larger wheel which aids pace and ease of use) but I am not sure if the prices have come down yet.... I am sure they are still wandering around the £500+ mark.

With a hybrid, you can always ramp it up for a really good entry level XC bike :D
 
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Perfect :lol:

Just dont put Continental Mountain King or Rubber Queens tyres on the bike..... They are what I have on my bike and they grip like a toffee apple to clothing.
 

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£300 ain't that much for a bike. That said, it's probably just on the right side of the money line - where the other side is something that breaks down so much you give up on it entirely and have wasted your cash.

With that in mind, I'd be inclined to avoid stuff like disc brakes and even suspension; at that price they won't be great, and they'll probably incur cost savings elsewhere.

Most importantly, look at sale and clearance models from previous years, like this: Fuji Bikes Classic Lux - 7 Speed - Mens | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm on an Alfa Forum - I like things which tend to break down. Haha. Although I wish I had asked for a little more from the scheme.

Unfortunately I can only spend my voucher certain places. Mainly local independants & Evans. I'm torn between the Fuji & the Jamis, can't make up my mind!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I went for a GT Trail 1.0 2013. Picked it up earlier.

The sales assistant suggested it after a short chat about my requirements. His theory was that because I didn't know if I would expand my cycling ventures further in to trails & woodland then the GT will give me the best go at every aspect of cyclying so I can tell in which direction it may take me. It is a little more than I wanted to spend but I got £50 worth of free accessories of my choice.

I'll update how my cycling future goes. Thanks for all the advice all!
 
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