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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Right I have my eyes on a dealer car which I am told has ceramics. As an aside they are painted yellow and from what the configurator showed me ceramics can’t be specced with coloured calipers. Dealer assured me they are so we’ll see.

Anyway, has anybody experienced ceramics on the Quad ? Is this less feel than with the steels ? How easy is it to get them up to and maintain operating temp ?
 

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Right I have my eyes on a dealer car which I am told has ceramics. As an aside they are painted yellow and from what the configurator showed me ceramics can’t be specced with coloured calipers. Dealer assured me they are so we’ll see.

Anyway, has anybody experienced ceramics on the Quad ? Is this less feel than with the steels ? How easy is it to get them up to and maintain operating temp ?
I think I'm one of the few who spec'd the ceramics and I can't honestly give you a compelling reason why! I've little/no intention to track the car and their longevity, reduced weight and lack of brake dust with regular use is hardly a strong enough argument given the premium involved. That said, they look fantastic, (filling the wheels to the extent that you can't squeeze your fingers between them and the rim when cleaning!) and they operate brilliantly with no squealing at any speed, as I was warned they might. You do have to operate them just once or twice to get them "up to speed" so to speak. A caveat to the above is that I've only put 3500 miles on my baby since last Feb, although the car did take over when the car ahead stopped (very) abruptly at a roundabout a few months ago and the brakes where fantastic in avoiding a coming together! No regrets and if they're not upping the asking price too much I wouldn't hesitate.

Btw, I have red calipers!
 

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Did I read somewhere that they make no difference to the stopping distance? It's longevity and lack of fade for track use that are the reason for getting them.
At Millbrook, I did an emergency stop from 60mph immediately followed by the same again from 100mph then repeated twice more and the (standard) brakes felt the same (I.e. amazing) every time.
I guess it depends if you want to track it.
If the car you want has them on then it doesn't sound like they would be a problem in every day use other than to maybe get some heat into them on a cold day before you find you need them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
^^^

Yes ceramics don’t necessarily equal better stopping power but they do always equal better levels of stopping power for longer.

I have them on another car and as you say it does help to get a bit of heat in them early on in a drive but in fairness that’s the same for all brakes.

Reason I’d Be interested in them is that whilst I may do a track day or two I will definitely do several mountain trips and my heavy foot plus a fairly weighty car always ends up in brake fade !
 

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^^^

Yes ceramics don’t necessarily equal better stopping power but they do always equal better levels of stopping power for longer.

I have them on another car and as you say it does help to get a bit of heat in them early on in a drive but in fairness that’s the same for all brakes.

Reason I’d Be interested in them is that whilst I may do a track day or two I will definitely do several mountain trips and my heavy foot plus a fairly weighty car always ends up in brake fade !
welcome back to the club, soon, wonder waht PG would say?!

what color this time?
 

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I'm tempted by the upgrade for my car Mr Brooking. Main reason being to avoid having to regularly change pads and discs after track days due to them being cooked. However, at £200 a set of front pads (fitted) and only £600 for front discs fitted you'd need to do a good few track days to justify the cost. If I could re-order now I'd be thinking very hard about the CC brakes, but not because they are any better on track. Purely a convenience thing.

Anybody going to Silverstone on Friday? I'm thinking about it.
 

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Brooking. We have now had four QV on our local tracks, all with steel brakes. All have suffered major thermal stress and massive pad wear (by buddies car only lasted four sessions before the pad warning light came on - it was a three week old car!). All of us are experienced track junkies - usually running 12-16 track days a year in a variety of gear mostly Porsche GT3/4 etc so we are pushing on. The steel set up is great on the road, Ive never managed to get my brakes out of shape and my QV is a bit of a "Ring Taxi" around these parts doing high speed laps of quiet back rods and taking plenty of road punishment. However, put it on the track and push it hard and the front Corsa tyres wont last a day (shoulders shave to the cord) and the brakes wilt (pads evaporate filling up all the rotor holes and teh thermal stress in the rotor annual is alarming causing spiderweb cracks quickly in the centre of the disc).

I could not justify CCB when I ordered my QV. Granted there were no discounts on the very first cars. I forced myself to stump up for the Sparco seats but couldnt do those AND the CCB. In hindsight and with discounts as they are these days I would most certainly have ordered CCB. However the Sparco seats would definately stay - they are simply the most comfortable seats Ive owned in any car, they look fabulous and really set off the interior (they are one of the first things people comment on when they sit in my car especially in the back seat where they can see the carbon shells - Im so happy I did not order the tinted rear and side windows - its such a pleasure walking up to the car and seeing those CF seat backs from behind or on entry).

HOWEVER, being a track guy through and through (usually 2 times a month) I REALLY would love my QV to be "track durable" if only so I could press it into service on the occassions when the GT4 isnt track ready or doenst have sufficient tyres etc. I simply will not use it on the track knowing what I do now and having witnesses three other friends having to rpelace front tyres, rotors and pads at vast cost after 6 session (a full day for example) on the track.

Ive spoken with a couple of guys in USA who have CCB and track hard and regularly. The set up is able to handle the track without major issue but it must be noted that the CCB pads are only giving 4-5 track day life and are $1300 USD a front set! They have had their rotors weighed and although they are still in spec after 10+ hard track days they are also wearing at a rate faster than your would expect from a Ferrari CCM CCB rotor or indeed a Porsche PCCB rotor. They are very expensive to replace. The issue is commonly believed to be total lack of any brake ventilation for the front rotors!

So in summary I would order the car again with Sparco AND CCB for my particular use.

Here are a few pictures of my mates car after 3 sessions at our local track. Car was delivered new 3 weeks prior. This was right hand side rotor and tyre on a CCW track, Ive posted these somewhere else on here before. Its a real issue. If you buy a QV with steel rotors and are any way competant on track simply do not take it to the track without budgeting for new pads and rotors (at least one rotor) by the end of the day!

PS Im now firmly of the belief that all the development of this car was done on CCB. The worshop manuals I downloaded hardly even talk about the steel rotor set up and their unique caliper. The CCB caliper is larger and the pads have a much greater swept area. The steel rotors are a new product form Brembo with a contiguous cast of steel rotor ring (its a very narrow ring when you look at it compared to even the brake son my MKIII Focus RS or 2016 Megane RS 275) and an alloy bell. all early press cars and all first 2 months delivery cars in Europe were CCB. Alfa knew the steels wouldnt handle the media track days and I believe they were working on the steel package very late in the piece. The car lacks ventilation because there is no space in the front bumper to pipe air through - Alfa must have known this and this the CCB was the early conceptual default design package for this QV variant.

Lastly - If i were ordering a Stelvio QV I absolutely wouldnt not consider that 1800+kg vehicle without the CCB's for all the reason's above - moreso because with that particualr vehicle and my back road drives I would definitely have issues with the steel brakes...
 

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Long days in New Zealand. Mother of God, that tyre ? The lack of cooling in the brake area is obviously allowing massive heat transfer to the tyre. Gonna need an Adrian Newey to resolve that one.
 

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When I tracked mine at Bedford it probably lasted about 10-15 laps of the GT circuit before the brakes were showing signs of pad transfer. I kept going in the afternoon and brakes were pretty shot by the end of the day. Not worn out but lots of vibration through the peddle. Took a good 3 weeks of normal road driving to smooth out the disk surface.

If you are going to track it in a big way i don't think you have any choice but to get the CCBs and eat a lot of expensive pad replacements.
 

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Dynamic mode is also pretty heavy on the brakes too. Lots of esp / tc interference. Are these cars run in race mode at all?
 
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