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BBC NEWS | World | Americas | French plane lost in ocean storm

Link says it all really. :( Poor souls.

I always thought planes had static disruptors fitted to 'earth' any direct strike :confused: Also secondary and tertiary wiring looms in case of such circumstances :confused: and whats this about ground radar not being in contact with aircraft that fly over the Atlantic :eek::confused:
 

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Lightening is only a possibility. still very sad !
 
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I always thought planes had static disruptors fitted to 'earth' any direct strike :confused: Also secondary and tertiary wiring looms in case of such circumstances :confused: and whats this about ground radar not being in contact with aircraft that fly over the Atlantic :eek::confused:
I thought aircraft such as the Airbus 330-200 were designed to act as faraday cages?
 

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I think there's more to this than meets the eye:eek::(
 
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Sounds as though it flew through an area of extreme turbulence...even saw one reference on Reuters to a cabin depressurization event. They reckon the pilot had little time to correct the situation and get a call out. Thunderstorms in that region are particularly strong, with tops exceeding 50,000 ft. He was flying at 35,000. Poor buggers...must have been terrifying, knowing they were well out into the atlantic by that time...
 

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I think there's more to this than meets the eye:eek::(

What he said.

Planes are designed to be able to withstand lightening and turbulence, plus it is illegal for planes to fly through thunderstorms deliberately in the first place.

I hope they find people alive, but it doesn't look good. :(
 
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...been doing it (mainly transatlantic) for over 20 yrs now...and only recently, I have found myself wondering if 'my number was up'. Then this happened. I think it's time to change careers. Statistics are bound to catch up with me sooner or later.
I'm a pretty seasoned flyer, but the one thing I really fear is severe turbulence, over any ocean...
 

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I'm a pretty seasoned flyer, but the one thing I really fear is severe turbulence, over any ocean...
Same here, luckily though I have only been in pretty bad turbulence on one occasion.

It is pretty scary, but you know that you will almost certainly be ok.
 

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...been doing it (mainly transatlantic) for over 20 yrs now...and only recently, I have found myself wondering if 'my number was up'. Then this happened. I think it's time to change careers. Statistics are bound to catch up with me sooner or later.
I'm a pretty seasoned flyer, but the one thing I really fear is severe turbulence, over any ocean...
Likewise. I do worry sometimes, especially the Schipol crash. An airline I fly with + an airport Im a regular visitor too. :(
 

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Sounds absolutely awful, must have been pretty sudden to just dissapear off a radar!
 

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Took off from Owen Roberts airport GC once in a tropical storm at night. Real roller coaster ride with the missus's face giving a good impression of a gooseberry!

I just imagined we were back with the Sqn.hacking across rough terrain, which is pretty similar Eh' Fredzeedex? Waazup' wid' jer' matie?

Could see the lightening flashes and blue sparkies' cracking across the wing tips. Stuff that for a game of soldiers, give me terra- firma and a set of heavy armour tracks by choice, rather than an aluminum cigar tube?
 

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Radar generally can only "see" so far. It is possible to get returns for objects over the horizon, but the accuracy decreases with range. Once over the Atlantic you are pretty much on your own, unless a passing AWACS picks you up.

Very sad, though thankfully quite rare.
 

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Lightning Thunderstorms & even very bad turbulence shouldn't be catastrophic for a modern airliner.
Yes, on an Atlantic crossing you are fairly "on your own", but your route is pre-designated & you still call in , as well as possibly being in contact with other airliners.
NO mayday call apparantly from the flt crew, which would seem to indicate a sudden catastrophic failure, or a situation that the pilot didn't think was worthy of a mayday call & then rapidly degraded to catastrophic.
Fairly safe to sat that there is no chance of finding survivors.
RIP.
Matt. (airline crew for BA).
 

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The theoretical range of radar is limited by the curvature of the earth as RADAR uses line of sight frequencies as opposed to, for instance sw radio that utilises "skip" as the radio waves bounce off the ionisphere.

I cannot remember the formulae from when i was at nautical college but it goes somthing like range in miles = quare root of antenae in meters + square root of the target in meters. For a plane flying at 10000 +m this would not really be restrictive but the power of the transmitter and more importantly the sensitivity of the reciever to recieve the weak returned echo would limit the effective radar range to a few hundred miles.

As Manicatel has said it looks like a very sudden catostophic failure has befallen them. It is very sad :(
 
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I just pity the poor souls who perished and their families who will grieve for them :(
 
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