Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Reid Bigland has relinquished Maserati/ALfa...


Fiat Chrysler Automobiles named Tim Kuniskis as the new global head for Maserati and Alfa Romeo while trimming some responsibilities from the brands' multitasking former boss, U.S. sales chief Reid Bigland.
Kuniskis, 51, assumes responsibility for Maserati and Alfa Romeo after serving as head of passenger car brands such as Dodge, Chrysler and Fiat, FCA said in a statement Monday.
The company also named Steve Beahm to replace Kuniskis as head of passenger cars in North America, effective immediately.
The moves will allow Bigland, 50, to focus more on North America, FCA's most profitable region. FCA's U.S. sales have fallen for 17 consecutive months, in part as the automaker scaled back on less-profitable fleet volume.
Beahm, 54, most recently served as head of Maserati North America and previously led FCA's supply chain management group in North America.
Both Bigland and Kuniskis will continue to serve as members of FCA's Group Executive Council, the automaker's highest-level management decision-making body, FCA said.
Bigland will continue to head of the automaker's entire sales operations in the United States and maintain his role as CEO of FCA Canada.
Alfa, Maserati focus
The shuffle will give more-focused oversight of FCA's two remaining premium brands. FCA has spent billions trying to resurrect the long-ignored Alfa Romeo for more than a decade, but it has fallen wildly short of optimistic volume and product expectations it laid out in 2014.

Kuniskis joined Chrysler in 1992 and rose through the automaker's business center operations and marketing organization. Mr. Kuniskis holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from State University of New York. He was born in Rochester N.Y.

"With the launch of the Alfa Romeo Giulia and Stelvio and the Maserati Levante complete, we must now intensify our focus on the commercial elements that will drive global growth for these brands," FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne said in the statement.
"As Reid has established the commercial foundation for Alfa and Maserati, today's announcement allows Tim to dedicate his efforts solely on the next chapter of these storied brands. In North America, with the execution of our industrial plan now well underway, shifting from cars to SUV's and trucks, Reid's complete attention will be placed on accelerating sales growth in the U.S. and Canada."
FCA spun off Ferrari into a stand-alone company in 2015, and press reports last summer said Alfa and Maserati might follow similar paths.
Bigland had added global oversight of Maserati and Alfa Romeo in May 2016, when he replaced Harald Wester. At the time, Wester shed the sales roles to focus on another of his titles, chief technical officer.
Bigland has been a top lieutenant of FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne since Fiat S.p.A. gained control of the former Chrysler in 2009, when Bigland ran Chrysler Canada. He was made head of U.S. sales in 2011 and was given control of the Dodge and Ram brands for short periods.
He is a fellow Canadian citizen with Marchionne. And his resume with FCA has rivaled his boss's -- at least in the number and variety of responsibilities he has held.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Well between Alfa's unprofitability and Maserati Levante production cuts at Mirafiori, not really surprising
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
The Levante was aimed ,with optimism, at China and they've been caught by their ban on pre-registration of new cars. Ironic when you consider the Chinese have poached most of the designers in Turin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
And what would you say in his defence he has achieved with Lancia , Fiat and Alfa to justify the billions he’s apparently spent?
By now he’d have created a halo model for at least one of them and a follow up model selling in some volume.
He’s killed at least one of the most historical marques and is not doing a lot for the ones he is concentrating on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,193 Posts
Lancia was a terminal basket case from the 1990s onwards, and plenty of other storied marques have gone away so it's hardly unique. It has no brand value outside Italy, putting any money into it was both a risk and opportunity cost, and it can still be revived if necessary at some future point without any further loss. So using it as a bellwether for Marchionne's performance is abject nonsense.

Bottom line is this.

If you're a Fiat shareholder, Marchionne has made you about five times your investment in the last few years. Oh yeah and stopped it going bust.

If you're an Alfisti, Marchionne has - eventually -
overseen delivery of at least one class leading car, rather than say getting rid of the brand altogether.

The rest of it, then. Let's talk about sales being down YoY in a chain of one year but let's not talk about how they went up every month continuously for about five years.

Let's talk about Fiat, miss out the Tipo, then ignore the fact that the 500 has been refreshed and that this os absolutely normal for a car of its type. Who is saying the same of Mini?

Let's talk about Alfa's product lineup a mere one year into their mainstream rebirth and moan that it's not enough cars.

Let's talk guff about M&A and then propose selling to some Geely-like a la Volvo, despite the fact that it would appear FCA - which dwarves Volvo - ultimately has similar profit margins.

End to end rubbish, then. There's plenty to be frustrated by under Marchionne's rule, but pretty much none of that article is on target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
Fiat also appears to be dead though?
Turkish market Tipo and the Panda based 500 gets new bumpers! Great!
Those cars lead customers to what next time?
And Alfa starts in the 3 series class now. The idea is Mini- 1 series-3 series and aspirations to bigger.
The 4C didn’t lead to a next stage. It’s you sized in the US and created no direct next stage.
Fine Marchionne has boosted shares for the period he’s been leading until departing but what’s his legacy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
Fiat has one of the least planned ranges of any manufacturer though.
Chrysler beyond Jeep is not healthy either.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
In stark contrast to the article above, Marchionne is considered top performing auto boss, and has been paid accordingly...

MILAN -- Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne delivered the best returns among its car-making peers the last few years. He was compensated handsomely as a result.
Marchionne*collected shares valued at about 29 million euros ($35.7 million) for the three-year period ended in 2016, according to the Italian-American automaker’s annual report filed Tuesday. He also earned 9.68 million euros in base compensation and bonus for 2017.
Fiat Chrysler awarded the shares as part of a performance-based pay program in which Marchionne achieved all profit and business plan targets and delivered a 280 percent total shareholder return during the three-year stretch. That was tops among the 10 auto manufacturers the company counts as its peers and trounced the 24 percent median return.
Marchionne, 65, plans to retire in the first half of next year. He sold some of the stock delivered to him in 2017 to pay for associated taxes, the company disclosed in November
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,497 Posts
Clearly, as one would expect from it's origin, very much the American perspective.

However it would seem clear that the rest of the world is expected to drive whatever the US currently considers the best sort of vehicle according to this quote embedded in the article ""There has been, in our view, a permanent shift towards [utility vehicles] and pickup trucks,"-Marchionne January 2016". Is this truly the case for the rest of the world or is there still a market for a standard hatchback, saloon or SW?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
"
Letting products age
Within months of taking control of Chrysler, Marchionne met with its dealers in Las Vegas. There, he made the first of what he called "a promise for a promise" — namely, that the automaker would commit to invest in and improve its products if dealers would agree to invest in their stores and improve their business practices with the public. Marchionne has since renewed this promise and did invest in FCA's lineup, especially early on. But the pace of product renewal has steadily slowed. The Dodge Journey, Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger, among other vehicles, still ride on platforms from the DaimlerChrysler era. Promised luxury SUVs, the Jeep Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer, have been delayed. The Dodge Grand Caravan, long scheduled to die, was re-engineered and placed back into extended sales service in 2017 because no affordable substitute had been developed to protect the value of the Chrysler Pacifica."

Dividends instead of investment. A bit short term but then his term is nearly up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37,954 Posts
"We hadn't seen anything like you. You took $2 billion, roughly, and you've turned it into around $72 billion, and more important than that, there are many hundreds of thousands of families across many nations that are better off because of you and your team."
Including the families ,in Turin,of people who are into their 4th month at home because nobody wants a Levante. A friend with a cousin back in Turin on lay-off was telling me the people can't wait for Marchionne to retire. You just need to go there and get told over and again "this used to be Fiat city". Whether he made Fiat last a bit longer than it would have, probably he did, the 500 needed some investment a while back.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top