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Rust is a never ending battle... Spend enough money and anything can be saved, most because the underside will be a completely different car at some point!!!

Would assume if OP is in Greece then rust might be slightly less of an issue there.
 

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Rust is a never ending battle... Spend enough money and anything can be saved, most because the underside will be a completely different car at some point!!!

Would assume if OP is in Greece then rust might be slightly less of an issue there.
Just a bit.... didn't help that the way I park the driver's side is the side most open to the elements and the damned gritter lorry....grrrr.
 

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Not all CF3 engines drink oil. Mine in a GTV doesn’t and the one in the 147 we had didn’t either.
Odd, i was under the impression that the CF3 has slightly undersized piston rings in an effort to reduce internal friction and thus make the engine more economic. My 1.6 105hp 147 did 1L per 1500-3000km, depending on how vigorously it was driven. This was on selenia 10w40 mind you, from what im told 10w60 goes a long way to solving this.
 

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I think they are referred to as low tension piston rings. The lower tension means less friction and the compression in the engine is meant to push them out into the cylinder walls.

That is fine until carbon builds up in the ring grooves making them stick.

A lot of modern engines use this type of ring, but they tend to be engineered so that they are less prone to sticking.
 

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2010 Alfa Romeo Mito 1.4, 2003 Alfa Romeo GTV Phase 3 JTS
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I think they are referred to as low tension piston rings. The lower tension means less friction and the compression in the engine is meant to push them out into the cylinder walls.

That is fine until carbon builds up in the ring grooves making them stick.

A lot of modern engines use this type of ring, but they tend to be engineered so that they are less prone to sticking.
I was always under the impression that the CF3s liked to be revved out and thrashed regularly to keep them sweet. I guess this helps keep carbon buildup down? Or am I just wrong?
 

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Modern engines use oils such as 0w-30 or even 0w-20...

They pour very easily even at normal temps.

I was always under the impression that the CF3s liked to be revved out and thrashed regularly to keep them sweet. I guess this helps keep carbon buildup down? Or am I just wrong?
Isn't that the case with all engines? The odd redline is actually beneficial. Low rev and short journeys mean engines might not get hot enough so get gummed up with deposits.
 

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Modern engines use oils such as 0w-30 or even 0w-20...

They pour very easily even at normal temps.



Isn't that the case with all engines? The odd redline is actually beneficial. Low rev and short journeys mean engines might not get hot enough so get gummed up with deposits.
I run my GTV with 5W40 Fully Synthetic decent oil, and if I have a short journey, on the return leg I will give it revs when it is up to temp. When I first got it and did a cambelt change, I looked at the cylinders and it looked fairly gummed up, I'll check it again after I do a trackday and see what it is like then
 

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I am not sure that I would feel comfortable using such a thin oil as 0w20 or even 0w16

It is done to help cars scrape into lower emmisions bands, not to make engines last.
 

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I am not sure that I would feel comfortable using such a thin oil as 0w20 or even 0w16

It is done to help cars scrape into lower emmisions bands, not to make engines last.
Modern engines are also built to stricter tolerances i would imagine, so it isnt like filling a 2020 engine up with 10w60 is going to work well.
 

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Getting slightly off topic but my Honda Civic takes anything from 0w-20 to the older stuff like 0w-40. Manual recommends 0w-20 but this is possibly for economy reasons.

Before me the car was filled with 5w-30 probably because it's cheap although eBay sells Mannol fully synthetic 0w-20 for £20 in 4l cans which is as cheap as it gets if you ask me.

It is for economy and emissions but the engine was designed that way, it isn't exciting or powerful although some think 140 bhp and 125 ft of torque at something like 5k rpm is nice...

Latest oils come in 0w-8 which is insane, as 20 is already very thin!!
 

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Makes yo wonder how oils that thin maintain enough film strength to keep the metal bits apart when they are hot...
 

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Maybe as my car sounds like $hit on start up and the first mile or so but it soon settles down.

Suggestions are it's pretty much normal. Maybe I'll try 10w-30 on the next change to see if that helps it's cold starting at all...
 

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You are probably better off using 0w30
 

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I drive for economy in the other car so I'll stick with 0w-20 for a bit.

Mannol sell synthetic oil for dirt cheap on eBay, it's a tenner less than Castrol Edge 0w-30!

Japanese have been messing around with ultra low viscosity oils for years. Although they acknowledge using thicker oils for heavy mods.
 

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I am using Mannol oil in the Giulietta and my BMW.

Good stuff for the money. I think I paid £36 for 20L
 

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I'll probably start buying it in bulk now as it seems to be a decent enough oil, or at least good enough for 6 month changes.

A 20L barrel of 0w-20 comes out at £55.

I don't change the Alfa's oil as I don't drive it enough and I'm too lazy to reach up to get that oil filter at the back of the engine :censored:
 
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