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Epoxy can be very useful...I repaired half a dozen pin ***** holes in a bike fuel tank to get through the MOT....with a view of replacing the tank...then forgot about it for three years! I sold it like it. But of course that was not under pressure. Plastic welding can be stronger than the rest of the item if done right. A lot depends on the type of plastic.
 

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Thanks for the info, I'll first try the epoxy (which feels like the simpler thing), if that doesn't workout, then I'll plastic weld. I'll search for any markings to see the plastic type.

What ever I do, it's definitely temporary because I can see a few cracks starting. If the car doesn't develop new problems, I'll invest the €250.
 

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The fuel pump / fuel sender unit is made of POM polyoxymethylene so if the epoxy bodge doesn't workout, I'll plastic weld it.

Apparently adhesives don't stick well to POM so I brought an adhesive primer (n-heptane) which might help.
 

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They do a similar product for super glue although it’s called activator and the difference in using it is like night and day so well worth you purchase it as I assume it will give the same result.
 

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So I bodged the crack about a month ago and the leak is gone, seems to hold up quite well. Will update if it leaks again. I used Liqui Moly 6179 epoxy because it says clearly that it's resistant against petrol.
936202

I used a soldering iron to melt the ends of the cracks to relieve the stress concentration there (got the idea from a video on fixing cracks in cylinderheads). I used the activator, then I applied epoxy on the crack and forced as much of it as I could into the crack using a screwdriver. Then I builtup a nice layer of epoxy and let it dry for a day at room temperature.

The lock ring that holds the fuel pump in place is a GM product (H10325852G)(Opel 4805259), which is not supposed to be reused, and is only available from the US. It is a real pain to get it off or on without the special tool for it (also from US). I mean it can be wedged out with great pain but reinstalling it needs a lot of creativity. The standard fuel pump tools won't work for this.

936204


Looking into the connector it is clear what the problem is here. The pressure regulator instead of being properly fit with seals etc is just interference fit into the housing. The metal pipe of the regulator runs till the top of the housing as seen above. The entire metal tube is constantly putting pressure on the plastic, and as the plastic ages, it starts to crack and starts leaking. That's 'German Engineering' for you. It probably would've cost them a few cents to put enough plastic there to prevent this from happening but no. **** you and your car as long as they save a few cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Hi everyone!

I have kept the old fuel pump and I would for sure give it a try with one of the methods that you discribe! You never know... it's good to have a spare!!

Thanks for the info!
 

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Well I would've never figured out that it was the fuel pump (without ripping everything apart) without your post so thank you as well!
 

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Due to the vagaries of searching this site, I didn't find this thread until after I'd diagnosed and fixed the same issue... however, for new victims of the above shoddy siemens-vdo 'engineering', I was able to fix mine with plastic welding up the crack. I didn't have confidence in finding an adhesive that would stick well to what I guessed was a PP or HDPE plastic. Kudos to @159fan2018 who identified the plastic! The epoxy Liqui-Moly 6179 isn't easily found in Australia (only the lubricants).

Hopefully, the heating/softening involved in the plastic welding may have relieved a build-up of stress between the metal feed pipe and the plastic housing.

I'd already posted my fix on another thread with a similar cause, as an aid to the intrepid! Link to that post: Fuel tank pressure and hesitation

I also didn't want to remove the pump - on my 159, the tank port is mis-aligned with the under-seat body access port (probably a result of local dealer replacing tank under warranty many years ago) and I could see extreme difficulties arising in re-installing the seal and clamp ring, if I could even source new ones in Australia. The official tool wouldn't be able to be used without dropping out the tank!
 
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So I bodged the crack about a month ago and the leak is gone, seems to hold up quite well. Will update if it leaks again. I used Liqui Moly 6179 epoxy because it says clearly that it's resistant against petrol.
View attachment 936202
I used a soldering iron to melt the ends of the cracks to relieve the stress concentration there (got the idea from a video on fixing cracks in cylinderheads). I used the activator, then I applied epoxy on the crack and forced as much of it as I could into the crack using a screwdriver. Then I builtup a nice layer of epoxy and let it dry for a day at room temperature.

The lock ring that holds the fuel pump in place is a GM product (H10325852G)(Opel 4805259), which is not supposed to be reused, and is only available from the US. It is a real pain to get it off or on without the special tool for it (also from US). I mean it can be wedged out with great pain but reinstalling it needs a lot of creativity. The standard fuel pump tools won't work for this.

View attachment 936204

Looking into the connector it is clear what the problem is here. The pressure regulator instead of being properly fit with seals etc is just interference fit into the housing. The metal pipe of the regulator runs till the top of the housing as seen above. The entire metal tube is constantly putting pressure on the plastic, and as the plastic ages, it starts to crack and starts leaking. That's 'German Engineering' for you. It probably would've cost them a few cents to put enough plastic there to prevent this from happening but no. **** you and your car as long as they save a few cents.

Hi, We're you able to re-use the old lock ring for your Pump? Mine is a 159 3.2 JTS V6, and I just suffered same fate... I had already order a new parts from the dealer and it might arrive in a week. But reading yung input, I don't know yet if the pump I ordered from the dealer includes the "lock ring that holds the water pump"
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Hi, We're you able to re-use the old lock ring for your Pump? Mine is a 159 3.2 JTS V6, and I just suffered same fate... I had already order a new parts from the dealer and it might arrive in a week. But reading yung input, I don't know yet if the pump I ordered from the dealer includes the "lock ring that holds the water pump"
Hi friend,
The lock ring that holds the fuel pump can be re-used. I re-used mine and I have no problems at all.. and it's been three years since I replaced my fuel pump. So if the lock ring isn't damaged you can re-use it. The fuel pump doesn't come with the lock ring.. at least here in Greece. I think it's a different part number.
 

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Hi friend,
The lock ring that holds the fuel pump can be re-used. I re-used mine and I have no problems at all.. and it's been three years since I replaced my fuel pump. So if the lock ring isn't damaged you can re-use it. The fuel pump doesn't come with the lock ring.. at least here in Greece. I think it's a different part number.
Thats good to know. Appreciate your feedback...

Regards to all alfisti in Greece..(y)
 

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This ring was broken on my Lancia Delta Di (1.8 TBi engine)
Had severe fuel smell in the cabin. Checked all other possibilities. After removing back seats found the culprit.
Broken ring and the wrongly mounted pump unit...
Don't know if the tank is the same... could be... I had the opportunity of a filled yard at a Lancia specialist in the Netherlands to find a replacement.
And the ring(s) of the Lancia Lybra, correctly fitted. Rubber and the plastic fastener.
Had to take care positioning the pump, fits only one manner... had to play with it... be carefull on that.
Then onward the ring could be tightened with great care...
Since then no more fumes...

Succes over there, keep driving your beauties to the max!
 

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Just as a FYI on this issue - For Aussie punters, I just found the following product online, for those less intrepid (or optimistic) about using a hot welding solution near fuel! This stuff is expensive, but much less than the new part, and sounds like it would do the trick: Easy-Mix PE-PP 45 from Swift Supplies
 
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