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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

Im looking, after xmas, to get my alloys refurbished professionally as mine are pretty awful from the previous owner attempting to colour over all the flaked off paint, and to be frank it looks horrid.
Soo.. I will be looking at having them done properly, and just want some advice on good local places to me (Dorset/Poole) and, colour, I was thinking of maybe changing the colour.

The current colour of them is a light grey, they are standard 5 point teledials. The colour of the car is also the standard grey/silver type. (Sorry, dont know the exact colour name)

Im not 110% sure I will change the colour, but I just fancy something different.

Im open to opinions on the colour, so fire away. I do like matt black alloys, but I dont think they would go very well with a grey/silver car to be honest.
 

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you could save yourself a bit of money and do it yourself. only need some wet and dry, filler, primer, paint and lacquer

I'd be tempted to paint them either a gloss black or hyper silver, with it being a grey body
 

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I did mine, myself. The result is pretty good but it's quite a bit of work to get a good finish.
A couple of words of caution. The world and his wife are offering wheel painting services but beware of some of the apparently cheaper ones; some only paint the outside, with some types of wheels, like Alfa teledials you see quite a lot of the inside, which is often the most cruddy (certainly the area that took me longest to prepare). It makes a big difference to the end result.
Some don't take the tyre off so water and grime get back in round the edge and you are back to where you started.
Worth spending a bit more to get a proper job, it really lifts the whole car.

Not sure about coloured wheels on a silver car but I am a bit old fashioned......
 

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I did mine, myself. The result is pretty good but it's quite a bit of work to get a good finish.
A couple of words of caution. The world and his wife are offering wheel painting services but beware of some of the apparently cheaper ones; some only paint the outside, with some types of wheels, like Alfa teledials you see quite a lot of the inside, which is often the most cruddy (certainly the area that took me longest to prepare). It makes a big difference to the end result.
Some don't take the tyre off so water and grime get back in round the edge and you are back to where you started.
Worth spending a bit more to get a proper job, it really lifts the whole car.

Not sure about coloured wheels on a silver car but I am a bit old fashioned......
Totally agree... I spent four eight-hour days on my wheels (standard phase-2 Spider 16" alloys). Not aware of any wheel-refurbishment places here and if there were, I didn't expect they would take as much care as I did. Basically, two days to clean inside and out (including stripping balance weight adhesive, sanding out coarse scratches from tyre shops who fit balance weights, and removing any traces of corrosion), one day to fix damage and prime, one day to finish (wet-sand, coarse metallic silver, clear, and unlike the original finish, silver and clear inside and out, though that does tend to lead to runs).

- Before
- The mess of cleaning
- Cleaned, filled, and sanded 400-grit ready for primer
- Primed, ready for 600-grit wet sanding. Made me think about painting them white! :lol:
- Four coats of silver base and three coats of clear done
- Different lighting. This is the same wheel as in the 'Before' shot


Quite expensive when taking 24 work hours @$20/hour into account plus $300 materials, £370 for a set of four standard wheels, anyone? :rolleyes:

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry for not getting back to anyone sooner, been out of town!!

Thanks for all your ideas, and places to have them done.

I was thinking of doing them myself, I can get my hands on a sandblaster from a friends work, so I might give it a go. I suppose, if it **** it up, I can always just take them somewhere. Already sandblasted it could also be cheaper! :D

I am liking the idea of gloss black, I'll have a think on it over xmas.
 

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Sorry for not getting back to anyone sooner, been out of town!!

Thanks for all your ideas, and places to have them done.

I was thinking of doing them myself, I can get my hands on a sandblaster from a friends work, so I might give it a go. I suppose, if it **** it up, I can always just take them somewhere. Already sandblasted it could also be cheaper! :D

I am liking the idea of gloss black, I'll have a think on it over xmas.
Sorry but I don't think sandblasting is a good idea. I had that done once, managed to ruin the wheels completely and that was with a 'professional' operating the 'media blaster'. You will be left with a rough cast aluminium finish (a bit like early Mazda MX5 or some Toyota wheels) which will be impossible to keep clean. It works on those cars because, somehow, they don't have as much brake dust as we do. On neglected examples you can see the brake dust eating into the rough-surface alloy.

It will take many coats of primer-surfacer and hours of sanding to get smooth again. Therefore it would probably make getting them refinished elsewhere much more expensive!

Instead you could do as I did and wet-sand (240 grit) and fill any defects, then prime those areas, sand with 400 grit, and paint. The result you get will be in direct proportion to the time spent :)

Or if the problems are widespread, consider brushing on a chemical paint stripper to get all the previous coatings off, but I don't really recommend that as the original thick grey coating (under the paint) is generally durable and best left on there. I find with paint stripper, it's all or nothing - any coating left behind cannot be painted over, because the paint stripper stays impregnated in the partially-stripped coating and interferes with the new paint.

-Alex
 

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I used:

Wheels Works UK | Alloy Wheel Refinishing. Full factory refurbishment, powder coat, wetspray and custom finishes | Contact Us

in Crawley, to do the skanky ho' wheels on my 145.

They dip your cars in some nasty chemicals to strip off all the old finish before they do any fixing or painting.

If you have a silver Phase 2 car then you need black chrome effect (as mine... they're more glossy and chromey than they look in the photo.. and they gets more "black" when they get a hint of brake dust on them).

If you have a Phase 1 (more black on the bumpers and no chrome nose) then you wants satin black for the street-rod look.. :D



Ralf S.
 

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Agree with Lepsons! IMHO there are the best refurbers in the country ehnce why i have done the 300 mile round trip to them a few times in the last few years
 

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Alex, that's a great finish and the colour fleck looks very good indeed. Which silver paint did you use?
 

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Alex, that's a great finish and the colour fleck looks very good indeed. Which silver paint did you use?
Thanks! :)
In the Debeer series-400 basecoat paint range, there are probably about a hundred basic colours plus the metallic bases used to mix paint. I simply used the coarse metallic silver base with no tints/colours added. Alternatively there is a fine metallic base, which would give less contrast between light and dark and a more silky effect. However, if too fine, it ends up looking a bit 'grey'.

I expect other paint systems will have a similar coarse metallic base available.

The most sensational paint is a translucent fine metallic applied over a black basecoat, which gives the effect known as Shadow Chrome. However, it can look quite dark sometimes, so I have gone for the sparkly coarse silver instead, which is easier to apply and looks bright under all conditions.

-Alex
 

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Powdercote everytime IMO. I'm a paint sprayer and we charge £50 per wheel. To get a good finish with paint takes so much work and the finish is not as good as powdercote. You will have to etch prime 2k prime, flat primer,colour, clearcote and still be left with scratches showing. £65 per wheel + vat at lepsons swindon( i have a good friend that works there) and they will be perfect.
If the wheel is buckled it will be straightened and if you want the rims machined and laqured they can do that too ( at extra cost)
I can arrange a group buy type thing if the interest is there.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for all the advice,

I think I'll pass on sandblasting as Alex mentioned, and give it a sand down on the bad parts, possibaly.

The alloys have got really annoying flakey paint that has come off, and the previous owner just slapped some silver/grey paint on there, and its look dreadful tbh!

Any ideas on how to get all the black crud off the inside of the alloys? I tried a hand wire brush and that wasn't enough, as it was really think, greasy oily stuff, not just break dust and what have you.


Oh, and Alex, thats a nice job you done on your alloys, looks great! :thumbs:
 

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The only way you'll get the black **** off is to wire-brush it with a de-greaser at the same time.

It takes blinkin' ages and then you discover the wheel has alloy corrosion on it. Best job for me would be to save up the moolah and get the pro's to do it.. Wheel works dip the wheels in chemical stripping agent and then hone the metal back to smooth..


Ralf S.
 

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Well I wouldn't wire-brush, too many scratches... I would clean with engine degreaser (you probably have a split boot on a CV joint if there is grease there), then rinse with water and use a Scotchbrite pad with soapy (washing powder) warm water to get the brake dust/general dirt off. Use WD-40 to remove tar spots. To shift the brake dust you can try acid-based wheel cleaners too (not a good idea for the outside of a painted wheel but OK to shift the muck on the inside). Keep going until clean and smooth... If there is corrosion sand with 240 then 400-grit wet sandpaper. Prime and paint. Works for me :) I like a paint finish inside the wheels as well as outside...

I agree about the work required though, preparation takes me at least an hour per wheel but you can take a few useful shortcuts and concentrate on only the problem areas, powder coating is a good idea for getting a sound base on which to apply your choice of silver paint. Thanks for the kind comments too!

-Alex
 

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Thanks for the info Alex :thumbs:

sheppard: to get the crud off the wheel you'll need some strong, but safe wheel cleaner and then a strong tar-remover. Should bring them up very well indeed.

The pro's choice is usually (but not always!) Bilberry wheel cleaner and then Tardis to get rid of the Tar. Much easier and kinder than wire wool and elbow grease! Not stupidly expensive either. Do an ebay/google search.
 

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liking the idea of gloss black, I'll have a think on it over xmas.
If you are going to have them done professionally anyway, get an aerosol can of black and some masking tape and just do it. Or two on the same side anyway. Find out for £5 instead of £200.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the advice Alex! Appriciate it, I'll give it a whirl after xmas when Im not too busy.

As you said Alex, I think I have split a cv boot as its pretty noisy cv joint and theres grease hanging around that area. (Must get a new one asap)

Bezste, I'll give you idea a whirl too, do a Google, eBay search and see what I can get! :)

Thank you everyone who's given me there advice/ideas :)

-James
 
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