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The article below reminded me of something that has puzzled me for a while. Is there a good day to die?

My stepmother fought tooth and nail to have my father's date of death certified as 2nd April instead of the 1st - even though it was very likely to have been before midnight. She thought it was undignified to die on April Fools Day. :confused:

BBC News - Brazilian man killed in his bed by falling cow

This chap didn't have very dignified end, but it will probably be long remembered.

So, is there a good day ... and way ... to die?
 

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I am conflicted about death tbh. I absolutely don't want to eke out my closing years being ignored, unloved and incontinent. I suspect a great many people would, at my age, consider that they would have the courage to do something about it (moral or religious convictions aside) but I suspect many get overtaken by ill-health, circumstance and routine.

I don't think it would bother me at all when I popped my clogs. I suspect it'd be a bit annoying for others if, for example, I decided to 'off' on someones birthday, or on Christmas Day.

I'm 'open' at the moment to the circumstances of my own departure. I'd like to think it is some way off.
 

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Come the time, I genuinely would want to finally go in a comedy death. So much better than the weeks of lying semi comatose in pain and disorientation which I have had to see a number of times.
 

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Live every day of your life as if it is your last, and one day you will be right....



Seriously I can't see any point in being concerned about death... There is probably very little you can do once your number is up, so you should just live life and enjoy what you have now.

I am also under the belief that there is nothing after this life, no afterlife etc.. Which to me makes it more important that we make the most of the life we have.
 

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Live every day of your life as if it is your last, and one day you will be right....



Seriously I can't see any point in being concerned about death... There is probably very little you can do once your number is up, so you should just live life and enjoy what you have now.

I am also under the belief that there is nothing after this life, no afterlife etc.. Which to me makes it more important that we make the most of the life we have.
Works for me!

However, I wouldn't mind a comedy death; something like this:

It`s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World (Duranty Kicks the Bucket ) - YouTube
 

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I heard a terminal patient recently say 'The Universe was created in the big bang some 13 trillion years ago, but I was dead at the time and didn't see it. I'm now about to die after 50-odd years of life. Does my death bother me? No, I had 13 trillion years of practice!'
Brave... No
Smart...Yes!
 

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The day?- doesn't matter to me - it could be tomorrow it could be when I'm in my nineties. I will no longer exist so will have no knowledge or perception of the grief (or otherwise) of those left behind.

The way? - just not to wake from sleep would be my choice.
 

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Come the time, I genuinely would want to finally go in a comedy death. So much better than the weeks of lying semi comatose in pain and disorientation which I have had to see a number of times.
I have always thought it would be somewhat ironic to be run over by an ambulance but as Paul says, just not waking up would probably be the best way to go.
 

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but as Paul says, just not waking up would probably be the best way to go.
I first thought this (dying in one's sleep) when I came across what i thought was a post-mortem photograph years ago before the internet was invented. It turned out to be an artwork but the impact was not reduced once revealed.

It is a very graphic image but shows the body of a woman who died in her sleep but even after the pathologists intervention she looked so peaceful in death.

I will not post a link here for obvious reasons.
 

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death plays on my mind quite frequently, mainly due to my job, but also because ive got a bit of a 'dicky ticker'

i still don't know what the best way to go would be but, if i had a preference, it would be to go out with all my faculties intact, rather than being an elderly, carer-dependent shell of a human.

more specifically, i think i would prefer something akin to the 'falling cow' story as it would at least be quick and totally unexpected!:eek:


it's funny you should mention this as Brian Sewell (someone i tend to normally dislike), wrote quite a poignant piece in the 'daily nazi' today.. It made me feel sad for him, but also for the many others that are stuck in the same (and less privileged) rut.
 

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Would prefer either going in my sleep, or first choice would be having just crossed the finish line at the Nurburgring on a 6:18 in a burning fireball moments before exploding into oblivion.

So most likely would be in my sleep.
 

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"going in your sleep" is for the privileged few......

...the rest of us will die screaming in agony, crying for our [sometimes, long dead] parents!

happy days ahoy!:p
 

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Quite well written, that Sewell article....and one I can empathise with. Like many people, its my nightmare to end up in a "care" home incapable of looking after myself.....I hope I'd have the strength of purpose that my Dad had, despite several strokes and complete bewilderment about his circumstances, to simply refuse food and drink and effectively starve himself to death......I will say that the hospital staff were great and didn't try to enforce feeding, and did everything to make him comfortable.......whisper it, I think the medication may even have helped him on his way....for which he would have been grateful. Fortunately my sister and I were well aware of Dad's views and didn't try to get him to hang on.......just sat by him while he quietly slipped away. That'll do for me....but I don't have any kids to look after that, so maybe a plan B of driving off a big cliff. Don't want to inconvenience anyone, though....I think the suicides who stand in front of a train, for example, are incredibly selfish.......the stress on the driver is immense.
 

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Quite well written, that Sewell article....and one I can empathise with. Like many people, its my nightmare to end up in a "care" home incapable of looking after myself.....I hope I'd have the strength of purpose that my Dad had, despite several strokes and complete bewilderment about his circumstances, to simply refuse food and drink and effectively starve himself to death......I will say that the hospital staff were great and didn't try to enforce feeding, and did everything to make him comfortable.......whisper it, I think the medication may even have helped him on his way....for which he would have been grateful. Fortunately my sister and I were well aware of Dad's views and didn't try to get him to hang on.......just sat by him while he quietly slipped away. That'll do for me....but I don't have any kids to look after that, so maybe a plan B of driving off a big cliff. Don't want to inconvenience anyone, though....I think the suicides who stand in front of a train, for example, are incredibly selfish.......the stress on the driver is immense.
and there's the rub.

it sounds like your dad had dignity to the end, and was treated as he deserved to be treated. :)

it sounds like he had a very dignified death, and that must be comforting :)


but, i had a jumper off a bridge today - his outcome was not good.

we will never fully understand what goes through a human mind and will never be able to comprehend why someone would do something as dramatic as jumping off a motorway bridge.
:(
 
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
"we will never fully understand what goes through a human mind and will never be able to comprehend why someone would do something as dramatic as jumping off a motorway bridge"



As someone who has suffered from serious depression I can empathise but would not even know where to begin to try and explain to someone who has not been in that position as it is just a state of mind I hope others never have to experience .:(
 

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I hope when my time is up that I don't end up on something similar to the Liverpool care pathway.

How can withdrawing food and water from a patient who is terminally ill be a humane way of treating someone?
 

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I hope when my time is up that I don't end up on something similar to the Liverpool care pathway.

How can withdrawing food and water from a patient who is terminally ill be a humane way of treating someone?
The Liverpool Care Pathway is, in my experience, a dignified way of ending life if properly implemented.

My mother was put on the LCP at the end of her life; it was done with full consultation with the family, who were fully cognisant of the fact that she was dying & of her wishes. The whole process was explained both in person & in a booklet & at no time was any pressure put on anyone. Thank you, Northampton General!

There comes a point where we have to accept that people are dying; it can be difficult, but you've got to let go in the best interests of both the dying & the living. As I've said several times in the past, there's a big difference between prolonging life & delaying death.
 
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