Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
44,913 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The working relationships in what I do are complex. I run studies for a different company to that I work for - and other specialist roles on those studies are often fulfilled by people working for yet another 3rd party vendor.

I have just been contacted on LinkedIn by one of those people. He tells me that he is applying for a job with the company I work for, and asked if he can put me down as a reference, since he thinks it would help him in his application.

Here's the difficulty. I don't think he's very good. I have to chase him endlessly for updates, and when a task slips he never proactively informs me, I spot it myself and have to ask him for details.

So what do I do? He's a nice enough guy so I bear him no malice.

Ignore his LinkedIn message and hope he thinks I didn't see it?
Say yes, and hope they don't ask me for a reference?
Say yes, and if they do ask, give a decent but non-specific reference?
Say yes and tell the truth that I don't rate him?
Say no because I wouldn't be able to give him a good reference?

I don't have a specific problem with my company hiring him. It's a massive company, and I'm sure they have plenty of employees who are worse. Only a problem morally with actively lieing about my findings - but equally a problem morally with screwing him over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,039 Posts
I feel for you. It’s always a moral dilemma this one.

Decent but non specific.

1) you have helped him with a reference, but not over egged his abilities

2) if he gets the gooner for being hopeless, no one is going to come back to you and say ‘we hired him on your reference alone; it’s your fault we made a duff hire.” That will not happen. Be fair to him (decent) be fair to them (no specific).

Do the right thing, but don’t stress.

For what it’s worth, I had a similar dilemma last month. I managed one bland sentence. And it’s not like it’s legally binding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,224 Posts
My wife is an HR manager and I’m sure she’d suggest you can find the facts to acknowledge that he attends etc without being malicious. Quantitative rather than Qualitative info; He exists but not how well he exists!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44,683 Posts
Say yes and give a neutral reference, he turns up, nearly always on time etc etc. He'll never know what the reference said, he'll be eternally grateful if he gets it and ,by the sounds of it, you'll be eternally relieved if he doesn't.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
44,913 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ironically, if he gets the job, I'm less likely to work with him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I was asked by my senior manager about a guy that we (the company that I work for) were looking at taking on, I was able to answer honestly that I didn't know his capabilities well enough to comment, but hey he lives in the right area. they took him on. He lacks the ability to push himself, but when I have to go to one of his jobs, they're always clean and tidy. His timekeeping is spot on as well so I don't have to chase him up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,179 Posts
I'd been inclined to say no, but give an obscure or incomprehensible reason. e.g. "I feel it may be inappropriate, given the contractual relationships between our current employers."

As others point out, your formal reference could simply confirm he's worked on certain projects between certain dates. But someone might call you for an opinion, and if you're not happy to tell them what you've told us, it's better to avoid being a referee.

A man called Moses worked for me for a three month contract during which he cocked everything up. Had he been the original Moses, he woud have drowned the Israelites in the Red Sea. Every time he applied for a new job for in the next five years, endless agencies phoned me for comments. Very awkward - and all because I'd agreed to give a reference..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
44,913 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
To be honest, I think it's spot on. I've said yes to him. I suspect it'll never get to the point of me giving a reference, but if it does I'll just make it exceedingly generic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,224 Posts
I’m sure you couldn’t be held liable for them mistakenly not taking the advice you’re not giving them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,629 Posts
Say yes and give a neutral reference, he turns up, nearly always on time etc etc. He'll never know what the reference said, he'll be eternally grateful if he gets it and ,by the sounds of it, you'll be eternally relieved if he doesn't.
This. Be honest, if he's **** he is ****. Don't put yourself out to be nice. Nobody in this scenario will thank you.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top