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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

There are probably hundreds of threads about this, but just a quick one...

Will 156 16" Alloys fit my Phase2 GTV without problems please??

Cheers
Steve
 

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As in all the other threads...!
They will fit, but the offset is wrong.
They will sit 10mm further in than GTV wheels and look very silly.
 

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i had them on a GTV look nice but the profile of the 16" wheels make the tyres look like balloons

but hey you got a bargain
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Its fitted with 15" steel wheels and wheel trims at the moment, so its gotta be an improvement!!

I used to work in an Alfa dealership in the 90's, but I can't ever remember GTV coming with steel wheels, so I'm guessing the current wheels are from a 156 or other model anyway... :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i had them on a GTV look nice but the profile of the 16" wheels make the tyres look like balloons
Interesting point, but as I learnt on a certain flat six German car I have in the fleet, if you want decent ride quality / good handling, there comes a point where the size of the rim becomes purely cosmetic, and the loss of flex in the side wall makes the ride too harsh...

And as I live off a road with 6 large speed humps in the first 150yards, I want some sidewall flex!! (Must be getting old....) ;)
 

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Interesting point, but as I learnt on a certain flat six German car I have in the fleet, if you want decent ride quality / good handling, there comes a point where the size of the rim becomes purely cosmetic, and the loss of flex in the side wall makes the ride too harsh...

And as I live off a road with 6 large speed humps in the first 150yards, I want some sidewall flex!! (Must be getting old....) ;)
I think you're right and it's not just the ride comfort - tramlining can be a problem and steering feel can suffer. I run 45-profile tyres on my Uno (15" rims) and of course they look cool, but the steering feel and grip levels on a track are better on 13" wheels, it made five seconds difference in a 1:20 lap :) plus, the 60-profile tyres break away more progressively (and this can be felt more clearly in the steering). I think it was Turtle on this forum who pointed out that you don't see F1 cars running on 17" rims with 35-profile tyres - although they would look so much better, there must be a reason why they don't... Rubber is heavier than alloy, too...

If the width of the tyre is correct for the width of the rim, the tyres won't look like balloons anyway. I like the sidewalls to be vertical :cool:

Correct width for 16" wheel according to my Spider handbook is 6.5". Tyre for that wheel is a 205/50 16. The handbook also specifies a 15" steel wheel, 6" width, and 195/60 15 (so there you go! You have a rare survivor, a car bought by someone who wasn't talked into paying more for alloys...) it'd be interesting to weigh one of your steel wheels, it's probably lighter than the alloy wheel...

I have a friend who has 205/60 tyres on his 164 with standard alloy wheels (6" wide).
I have the same car, same wheels, but 195/60 tyres. Just that 10mm difference is enough to make the steering of my car feel lighter and more precise. To be fair, his tyres fill the wheel arches better; and as a bonus, they rub a hole in the wheel arch liner in the delicate cambelt area :lol: I think many people fit over-wide tyres and in 60-profile, they can indeed look like balloons!

I have 17" wheels on my 156 - the looks are worth it - but again I'm careful to run the specified 215/45 tyre size on the 7" rims.

On the other hand, sometimes you see 195 tyres on 8" rims. I think that fashionable stretched look is hideous, and I'm sure the tyre manufacturers don't intend their tyres to be used that way.

One of my first cars (Austin Princess) had a stupid choice of standard-specified wheel and tyre size. There were a few things wrong with that car but the choice of 4.5" rims and 185/70 14" tyres made the tyres look like balloons even when inflated to 40 psi, and driving into a street at anything more than walking pace produced a comedic squelching/squealing sound reminiscent of American cars in cheesy movies :lol: looking back I'm glad I had the experience of such a car, it must be terrible to start out driving a Ford Focus or some other car with class-leading handling and never appreciate what that means...!

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The handbook also specifies a 15" steel wheel, 6" width, and 195/60 15 (so there you go! You have a rare survivor, a car bought by someone who wasn't talked into paying more for alloys...)
I thought somewhere in the back of my mind, I remembered something about GTV with steel wheels circa 1999/2000 but there you go...

(And I bet there cant be many out there!)

Steve
 

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We have 156 teledials on the twinnie with 5mm spacers with 205/50/16s. 10mm hubcentric spacers would be better but they are likely to cost a fair bit more than the wheels... I wouldn't go any thicker than 5mm unless they were hubcentric.

5mm spacers with the correct centre bore are available from Alfa or occasionally turn up on ebay.
 

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What are you doing with the steel wheels?
If you don't mind me asking :)
 

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Its a funny old world but i have a set of 156 teledials coming this week. I have just ordered my hubcentirc spacers but i hope at 10mm it will not change the stance to much and will give me the look i want.
 

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Its a funny old world but i have a set of 156 teledials coming this week. I have just ordered my hubcentirc spacers but i hope at 10mm it will not change the stance to much and will give me the look i want.
More of a worry will be your 10mm hubcentric spacers cracking when tightened like the others on here have done...! 12mm or 15mm would have been a better & safer plan.
 

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More of a worry will be your 10mm hubcentric spacers cracking when tightened like the others on here have done...! 12mm or 15mm would have been a better & safer plan.
Perhaps to avoid the cracking it would be a good idea to use a torque wrench and apply the specified torque to the wheelbolts? I did that once for a laugh, the quoted torque was 80Nm for the FIAT Uno and it seemed like 'hardly anything' compared to the usual firm pressure I'd put on the long breaker bar.

EDIT: Specified torque for Spider/GTV wheel bolts is between 83 and 103 Nm (8.5-10.5 kgm). That's not much compared to, say, the 266-294Nm for the rear hub nut (I'm a bit nervous about mine now, my torque wrench doesn't go that high. I used an extension tube on the breaker bar and jumped on it, did them up using the same tool as used for removal).

-Alex
 

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Will be careful tightening them and will use a torque wrench will just have to be careful when getting a tyre changed and not let them use a airgun to tighten them .They may be quick and easy but they do like to strip the threads and overtighten the wheel nuts
 

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Perhaps to avoid the cracking it would be a good idea to use a torque wrench and apply the specified torque to the wheelbolts?
That isn't the issue.
The problem is the depth of the recess in a 10mm hubcentric spacer is often less than the spigot on the hub.
So as soon as you torque the wheel up the spacer cracks & fails...

That is why in EVERY thread like this we all recommend 12mm hubcentric or 15mm hubcentric spacers instead.
 

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This thread has made my mind up not to swap my original gtv alloys for 156 teledials :lol:
I agree. I was going to fit 156 Selespeeds to mine but it's just not worth it IMO. The 156 alloys weigh a lot more as well increasing the unsprung weight.
 
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