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Hi the cam belt has snapped engine lost power and stopped. What I would like to know is how much potential damage may this have caused and which engine parts do I need to take apart to find out the damage?. Looking at the engine there are no physical signs but an guessing the internals may be a different story. Thank's John
 

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Sorry to hear...your best bet is to get a replacement engine....2.5 v6 engines are not that expensive and will be more cost effective then repair

My two pence worth...it's worth saving if the bodywork is not too rusty!!
 

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Either a replacement engine or a replacement pair of cylinder heads is your best bet. Putting a 3 litre in is a common upgrade although you'll pay a bit more for a 3 litre than you would a 2.5.

Where are you based, I may be able to help/advise.
 

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Sorry to hear...your best bet is to get a replacement engine....2.5 v6 engines are not that expensive and will be more cost effective then repair

My two pence worth...it's worth saving if the bodywork is not too rusty!!
Hi I am based in Malvern Worcestershire. Unusually I have owned the car from new and the engine has done a genuine 65.000 miles. The car is in very good original condition. I am thinking about removing the inlet manifold to see if the valves are not seating properly?. Thank's John
 

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If you have the time/money/commitment then drop a 3.0 in it. I don't live near you or I'd show you mine. I had a 2.5 before this one came up and the difference is just night and day. You get more power everywhere and the fuel economy actually goes up as it needs to rev less. I didn't even notice the engine being less rev hungry either.

Having owned a 3.0 156 I feel the 2.5 was a deliberate compromise from Alfa Romeo.
 

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they usually bend valves .. usually a few too.. so i think thats a given.. spare heads or have your fixed.. keep the 2.5 if you want it original or low cost repair with some spare heads.. but 3,0 would cost about the same..
 

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With that relatively low mileage it could be worth while to keep the old block. Replace the heads and valves if there is no other damage to the pistons or other bits. An engine out job would make it far easier.

If you put in a used engine you will still need to have the cam belt and associated parts changed. Might as well get a new clutch at the same time if yours is manual as the engine is removed so easy access.

Out of interest, when was the last time you have the cam belt changed on your car?
 

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Hi I am based in Malvern Worcestershire. Unusually I have owned the car from new and the engine has done a genuine 65.000 miles. The car is in very good original condition. I am thinking about removing the inlet manifold to see if the valves are not seating properly?. Thank's John
When was the last time you changed the belt? V6 belts are quite robust and do not tend to break unless there is an underlying problem or you haven’t changed it since new.

Reason i am asking is when I owned a 2.5v6 I discovered the belt had been worn away due to a distorted crankshaft pulley ( rubber had deteriorated) causing the pulley to chaff the edge of the cambelt. Just caught it in time.
 

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Reason i am asking is when I owned a 2.5v6 I discovered the belt had been worn away due to a distorted crankshaft pulley ( rubber had deteriorated) causing the pulley to chaff the edge of the cambelt. Just caught it in time.
I had the exact same problem when I bought mine.
I had to drive for 2 months before being able to make the change (with cambelt of course). It was quite a stress…
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The cambelt is the original one but I have kept a careful eye on it, obviously not careful enough. Just to start with how do I check the condition of the valves?. I have seen a video where by taking off the inlet manifold you can see the valves and how they are seating but this was not on a 2.5 V6 engine. I have used a local company before to rebuild the heads on my Stag, so this could be possible if the cost was reasonable. Thank's John
 

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Oh dear you used the cam belt from new?! I felt a bit scared going almost 6 years before a change. Alfa recommends 5 and most folk go with 3 it seems.
 

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I allow mine 4 years if mileage is below 10,000 total ... recommended is 5 years max.. or 70,000 .. though as above 3 years and 30,000 on the 3.2 lump.. valves arent stupid money around a 10 each
 

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I was feeling sorry for you......not now I'm afraid....... probably, a what ?, 20 year old cambelt (dont know your car year) but guessing around there!...you were lucky to get anywhere near that far. " I have kept a careful eye on it"...lol. What exactly did you expect to see?....by the time you see visible aging its usually snapped or just about to....and you certainly can't see the wear on the pulleys, tensioners and water pump....failure of any of which can cause the belt to have snapped. If you get it repaired perhaps leave the maintenance to a good indie next time and you just stick to putting petrol in....that's the little flap thing on the side btw!
 

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The cambelt is the original one but I have kept a careful eye on it, obviously not careful enough. Just to start with how do I check the condition of the valves?. I have seen a video where by taking off the inlet manifold you can see the valves and how they are seating but this was not on a 2.5 V6 engine. I have used a local company before to rebuild the heads on my Stag, so this could be possible if the cost was reasonable. Thank's John
You can only see inlet valves and then I doubt you will get an accurate idea of how damaged they are.

only way is to whip the heads off to check properly, anything else you are just taking up time that you could put in to stripping it down.

original belt...... you really did play cambelt roulette!
 

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The cambelt is the original one but I have kept a careful eye on it, obviously not careful enough. Just to start with how do I check the condition of the valves?. I have seen a video where by taking off the inlet manifold you can see the valves and how they are seating but this was not on a 2.5 V6 engine. I have used a local company before to rebuild the heads on my Stag, so this could be possible if the cost was reasonable. Thank's John
You cant really go off visually checking the belt condition, I guess if the belt is worn it may start to run to the edge of the pulleys and the tensioner mark might not be aligned. A sign of how old the belt is by checking its manufacturing date printed on it somewhere but as you said its the original. The aux belt can be checked visually as the ribs are rubber and will be perished when bending it back. It might still have its plastic impellor waterpump! so it could be the longest time a v6 has gone without a cambelt change! If you do keep the original engine, or buy a 3.0 with unknown history you should still need a new cambelt kit, water pump, gaskets and might as well do the auxillary belt.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank's for all the comments and info but still no one has told me if you could inspect the valves by removing the inlet manifold?.
The car is X reg 2000. I bought it new from Hersild and Heggoff Alfa dealers in Naerum Denmark and I drove it home, great memories!.. The car is genuine UK spec just came into the country via Denmark. Danish dealers were being offered huge discounts by the Italian factory to sell as many cars as possible. Some of you may remember Quentin Wilson giving advice on importing cars from Denmark and the Netherlands at huge discounts. Some months before the car was ordered I had a test drive at my local Alfa dealers and decided to buy the top of the range model with the sport pack 3 option, the UK dealers price was around £26,000 OTR. The danish option is the same car but MUCH cheaper, and was purchased at a very good exchange rate. The car has been rarely used so is in good bodily order and very original. I will check to date on the belt just to confirm it's age.
No doubt the heads will have to come off but as I mentioned this could never be more difficult the removing the heads from a V8 Stag.
 

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Inlet valves are only half the story. Even without the intake tubes you cannot inspect the valves properly.
The exhaust valves are more difficult to see even with the engine out of the car.
Bit the bullet and remove the heads. The valves can be fully inspected along with pistons.
The heads are easier to remove than a Stag or Dolomite engine, all the studs are at 90 degrees to the block. Just you need washers to clamp down the liners.
937163
 
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