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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My cute little 156 is in great condition overall - well for the most part. It has wintered in a barn, I've just serviced it, with new front brakes, new cam belt plus tensioner, roller etc and a refurbed variator. I then found some rust in the OSF floorpan where the floor meets the inner sill.

It's not horrendous, but is holed in a number of places in both front and rear floors. I've just started getting access to the floor by removing front and rear seats plus threshold trim etc. Lifting the carpet, moving the wiring loom clear of the floor and the sound deadening. Surprising how long that all took to do.

I can now see more clearly where the problems are, next step is to cut away the rusted metal then make up the repair sections. Just wondering whether any of you fellas on here have been into bat with floor rust snags? Know it's far from being a rare problem in the 156 - so any shared intel and experience would be welcome.

With best regards

Andy H
 

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Mine too. The rest of the car is beautiful. I repaired it for the last MOT but this was my first welding experience. Can't say I enjoyed it much and I did a poor job. I practiced on a wheel barrow before hand. If you know what you're doing I think the floor is as easy as it gets. I managed with only a Dremmel for cutting and I borrowed the welder. Definitely worth buying a reactive mask, I got one on amazon for pretty cheap and i can still see. I cannot comprehend how welding is even possible with the traditional mask.
What I've learned is that I'm not very good at welding but the floor doesn't have to look pretty. Next time I think I'll need to be much more careful with my cutting and shaping as small errors early on just amplify during the later stages and then you just have to start all over again. I wrongly thought this would be the easy part of the repair. If you can; buy a complete floor piece and then cut it to shape so that it has the correct corrugation. I think this would make life a lot easier and is definitely worth a few quid.

The advice I got here was very good and I also saw a lot of youtube tutorials.

Anyway I'm really not an expert with the welder but I can confirm repair is possible for relatively little money but plenty of blood, sweat and tears.

Good luck.
 

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In the 1980's I spent many happy hours welding up Morris 1000's....what total rot boxes they were, but... repairable. 156es are also repairable. It's just that people don't expect to repair rusted floorpans/sills/flitch panels these days...and labour charges make the task far more than viable unless you diy as 156es are in the bangernomic phase...except maybe the GTA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks fellas. RXE - wow that's an enormously enjoyable thread you've created there, great pics, plus it's very well written and an engaging read - bravo. Both your lads will be able to do their own spannering in future, much better than paying the trade - typical picture you've already provided!

Compared to all you've done/are doing - my 156 needs next to nothing. I've started cutting out the rust - and inevitably found more, sound and feel of the grinder (with a cutting disc) has 'scared' the car into revealing more crumbly brown eyesore! Typical joy of dealing with rot in old motors...so no surprise.

Apart from tomorrow (Friday) night, the weekend is booked with 6N rugby ? - a must, girlfriend time and helping a mate with a Subaru on Sunday. I have Monday off work, so hoping to have my Alfa's floor pretty much fully repaired by then - unless I uncover more rot in the process...! Sigh.

More to follow...
 

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Agreed - Good Luck England in getting the new record of 19 unbeaten games!
Also good luck to you on Monday with finding no more rust!:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you Unclejam for your good wishes - I've spent most of today dealing with the rust issues in my 156's floor - and got a lot done. It's not finished though, doing metalwork on your own means constantly checking inside the car in case any seam sealer or sound deadening is on fire. In my case, I had molten hot black seam sealer dripping off the bottom of the car, causing the welder to spit and adversely affect the quality of the welds - and slowing down the whole process.

I've got about another 3 hours of messy work left to do, finish the last bit of welding, grind all the welds back, then go back with the welder and fill in the gaps. Painting the new metal and weld beads is the easy bit - but then there's still the interior put back to do...! After all that it will need a major clean, inside and out! Car owes me some serious road miles after all the care and attention it's had!
 

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This is the part where other non-petrolheads go "Whaaat? - You could have been spending that time watching moronic TV like us, or wasting your precious hours obsessing over some soon-to-be-forgotten (non) celebrities latest hairdo!"
People who like to tackle and finish difficult projects get a rare satisfaction from the process and when you are finally driving around in a great example of a soon to be rare car, all that mucky hassle will have been worth every minute!

F.Y.I. My Wife thinks I'm nuts too :nuts:
 
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