Alfa Romeo Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I am needing new front brake disks soon, and I was wondering if the 305mm 156 GTA disks would be a straight bolt on swap as the hub diameters are apparently the same size. Or does the installation run into problems elsewhere?

The other option is just any aftermarket uprated disks.

The car is a 2002 156 2.5 v6 with the interior facelift.

Thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Neither the discs or the calipers from a GTA fit. You need the uprights aswell, and possibly the track rod ends. But Mito brembos might fit, and then you can use the 305mm discs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
I have a 156 V6 with an interior facelift. I have been considering getting a MiTo set so I could upsize the discs. Trouble is the cost of buying the calipers is silly. You're looking at 400 pound plus used or 500 each new.

I hate the brakes on my 156, but not that much.

Sent from my Mi 9T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the reply’s guys, yeah 500 quid each for the calipers is a bit of an expense😅 I think I’ll go for just standard disks with those autolusso pads as it should improve the breaking enough for now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
I've read a lot about people and not very good brakes in the 156. Mine seem good, responsive and the like. Do they vary? or is the variation in the brakes down to the individual. Maybe I am just use to bad brakes, they are a lot sharper than my older Mercedes brakes though. I think good pads make a difference and fluid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
There are lots of posts about 156 brakes being a bit rubbish. I've had 4 156s all with different engines and by far and away the worst are on the 2.5v6. I guess the extra weight is the cause.

The GTA with 305s and brembo pads was actually very good. Lots of GTA fans love the upgrade to 330, but I never tracked mine so maybe I'm biased.

Performance Friction pads are the best, but I got mine to work properly by just making sure all the components were clean and relatively new. I've got brembo pads and disks all round and it's okay. Just not great.

Sent from my Mi 9T using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yeah I think it must be something to do with the weight of the v6, as I have driven a twinspark and it felt like it stopped better. I’m gonna be trying the performance pads when I change the disks and see if that will make a difference
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
I used performance friction pads in refurbished calipers on my 2.5 v6 which used to be for track days and the braking was ok, especially when these pads are bedded in. Flushing the brake fluid makes a big difference when done properly. The 2.4 and 2.5 156s actually have a bigger bosch master cylinder and shorter stroke pedal. As a cost effective solution, you can fit the slightly bigger rear discs and carriers from the GTAs/late 156s which will help take some minor force and wear from the front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I used performance friction pads in refurbished calipers on my 2.5 v6 which used to be for track days and the braking was ok, especially when these pads are bedded in. Flushing the brake fluid makes a big difference when done properly. The 2.4 and 2.5 156s actually have a bigger bosch master cylinder and shorter stroke pedal. As a cost effective solution, you can fit the slightly bigger rear discs and carriers from the GTAs/late 156s which will help take some minor force and wear from the front.
Are the GTA disks an easy swap on the rears compared to the front then? That might be an option along with the performance pads, instead of wasting time and money fiddling with aftermarket parts that might be worse/a pain to fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
My car is an interior facelifted 156 and I believe the brakes were slightly upgraded from the factory. I did have an original 156 2.5 but I can't remember how the brakes were in that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Have you tried left foot braking? Usually that indicates that brakes are fine but its just the users pressure input with their more sensitive right foot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,778 Posts
The heavier cars still stop well but the pedal doesn't feel great and has a long travel than when given a good press. Having 2 156s right now, an early 1.8 with solid front discs and 251mm rear discs against the JTS which has the 276mm rear discs, I prefer the brakes on the 1.8 TS. Outright braking performance is very similar but the early ABS system (no ASR or VDC) has a better pedal feel and shorter pedal travel. The only significant difference is spirited open road driving in a hilly area can fairly get the 1.8 TS brakes too hot too easily. In my opinion the cars with the later ABS system could do with stainless steel braided hoses (or is there a diagnostic brake bleeding procedure in MES I don't know about?).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Have you tried left foot braking? Usually that indicates that brakes are fine but its just the users pressure input with their more sensitive right foot.
That’s a head on the dashboard moment if I slam my left foot breaking😂 I was more thinking since I know the disks need replacing soon as they are near the end of their life, I was wondering while changing them if I could upgrade them at the same time. I’m gonna go down the performance pads route and see how they go :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
That’s a head on the dashboard moment if I slam my left foot breaking😂 I was more thinking since I know the disks need replacing soon as they are near the end of their life, I was wondering while changing them if I could upgrade them at the same time. I’m gonna go down the performance pads route and see how they go :)

Ah ok. A fair thought when replacing any component in a car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Carefully check all pistons, these should be pressed back (or turned for rears) all the way with minimal effort, also checck the slider pins move freely in and out. Pads shoul nearly drop out of the carriers by themselves.

I've seen swollen brake piston seals, rust behind the dust boots pinching the pistons, swollen rubber grommets around slider pins, and pads rusted in the carriers, or just too big from new. They all impact brake durability but only the piston issues and pads stuck on both sides of disc cause immediated brake power reductions.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top