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Hi all,
I have been having a few issues with my 147 2.0L TS. I had a flat battery, turns out it was the alternator, so i got that replaced yesterday. Anyway i started it and the idle was ROUGH, it would occasionally drop 100rpm and then spring back up. Is this a common thing. Since getting the alternator i have only driven 1.2km.
Thanks in advance.
 

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2004 Alfa Romeo 156 1.8TS
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Nope - but also this shouldn't be affected by the alternator change.
How long has the car sat, without a charge and unused?
 

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Alternator change isn't recommended for this simple reason. Below is my message to another friend.
My 147 had the same problem and with an ohm meter I discovered that the alternator didn't charge. It cost around 90 euros to repair it (60 euros to remove and put it back in place and 30 the bosch regulator. Generally damages in alternators are cheap. They are consisted of mainly 4 parts. 1.The shaft with the winding, which is highly unlikely to be damaged. 2.The bearings of the shaft. They get damaged (if they get), after 200-300.000 kms (except if they were defective from the beginning) It is easy to determine when they need replacement because of the noise they produce when the shaft revolves.. 3.The bridge rectifier (not very possible to get damaged normally, and 4.The regulator which is 95% likely to be the suspect if the alternator doesn't charge.
 

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Alternator change isn't recommended for this simple reason. Below is my message to another friend.
My 147 had the same problem and with an ohm meter I discovered that the alternator didn't charge. It cost around 90 euros to repair it (60 euros to remove and put it back in place and 30 the bosch regulator. Generally damages in alternators are cheap. They are consisted of mainly 4 parts. 1.The shaft with the winding, which is highly unlikely to be damaged. 2.The bearings of the shaft. They get damaged (if they get), after 200-300.000 kms (except if they were defective from the beginning) It is easy to determine when they need replacement because of the noise they produce when the shaft revolves.. 3.The bridge rectifier (not very possible to get damaged normally, and 4.The regulator which is 95% likely to be the suspect if the alternator doesn't charge.
5. Brushes are also a potential failure point, as is the rotor wearing out from brush contact.

To be honest, in the better off countries, like Denmark, Sweden, Germany, France - nobody in a workshop bothers repairing an alternator. It might well still be part of the daily life in Greece, but it's not like that in a majority of other places. It's too ineffective and costly to spend the time repairing an alternator (or starter for that matter), when remanufactured parts are widely available, both from OE and in the aftermarket.

Either way your post doesn't really contribute to solving his issue with lumpy idle, and since the alternator already was replaced, your advice of repair is a little late too.
 

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There are two ways of taking the alternator out removing the bottom gearbox mount or taking the inlet manifold off. If they have taken the inlet manifold off they will have removed the engine ECU and disconnected the wiring harnesses. Its possible they haven't connected something back up properly but I usually see the symptoms you describe when someone has bent the pins on the ECU when putting the two connectors back on.
 

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5. Brushes are also a potential failure point, as is the rotor wearing out from brush contact.

To be honest, in the better off countries, like Denmark, Sweden, Germany, France - nobody in a workshop bothers repairing an alternator. It might well still be part of the daily life in Greece, but it's not like that in a majority of other places. It's too ineffective and costly to spend the time repairing an alternator (or starter for that matter), when remanufactured parts are widely available, both from OE and in the aftermarket.

Either way your post doesn't really contribute to solving his issue with lumpy idle, and since the alternator already was replaced, your advice of repair is a little late too.
Brushes are included in the regulator. To change it is 5 min work with a simple screwdriver. If you remove it you can see its type and buy it yourself. From the alternator parts I described its obvious that the idle can't be rough since it's not involved in anything but charging. The only ''rough'' noise could come only from the bearings. Sometimes it is useful to know how something works. It can save us money and time. Alfaowner has saved me both of them during the past. Last but not least it is very cheap to repair or service an alternator (provided you know how to do it). Workshops in the countries you mentioned do not bother because they only change parts generally and from my experience in other countries not everyonr is well trained.
 

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Last but not least it is very cheap to repair or service an alternator (provided you know how to do it). Workshops in the countries you mentioned do not bother because they only change parts generally and from my experience in other countries not everyonr is well trained.
It's more to do with parts availability, warranty on the work we carry out and pricing. The distributors are more likely to stock the alternator than a spare part for the alternator. And it's far easier for the mechanic to provide a warranty on a fully exchanged part, than only a smaller spare part. And it gives the customer a better peace of mind, knowing that the entire part was replaced, rather than repaired.
 
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