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(Post Link) post #1 of 21 Old 05-06-18 Thread Starter
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Lunatic people (women) with dogs

I try not to be mysogynistic (sp?) if I can ever help it - but why is it that when I am out walking the dog, I keep bumping into these befuddled anthropomorphizing (sp2?) harpies who inflict their neuroses onto their hounds?

I will start by saying that Malcolm is your fairly typical English Working Cocker (i.e. bonkers) who I like to walk off the lead in woodland or open parkland as much as I can. He is enthusiastic with other dogs and can run and chase for 23 hours per day if allowed. He doesn't have a bad bone in his body and has never snapped, growled or shown any iota of aggression to man/child nor beast in his time with me.

I stride manfully across these woods and parks with Malcolm racing around within a rough 10 metre area around me socializing with whoever and whatever he comes across (dogs, people, insects, inanimate objects - he's not fussy).

In the past month I have met the following ringpieces:

1. Lady with (perfectly behaved) brown lab on a 6 inch lead, with her eyes wildly spinning around as she yanks the lab away from everyone and everything while warning everyone who comes near her that her dog has autism (yes - that's right, autism) and can we all keep our dogs away from him at all costs

2. Lady with 3 dogs on various lengths of lead who, regardless of the wide open spaces around her, keeps these dogs on their leads (despite them trying to pull away in all different directions) and who flails and screams at any dog approaching her little rolling fiasco (and what self respecting dog wouldn't go and see wtf that is all about) to warn them away from her dogs as they "don't want to be attacked"

3. (todays one which triggered me) Lady who walks past me (with her dog on short lead, natch) and another guy who are both passing the time of day as his two big dogs (I'm going to say possibly ridgebacks?) chase my little Malcolm round in circles and through figures of 8 while he keeps ahead of them and occasionally doubles back, jumps up, bites their ears and runs off again - all the while all 3 dogs are tails a-wagging and coming back for more each time one of them stops - when said Loony Lady gets 50 metres further on before screaming at me that Malcolm is apparently petrified of these dogs and I am irresponsible to allow him to be mauled within an inch of his life while I stand chatting...... At first we couldn't hear what she was yelling so we both asked her what was up (thinking one of our dogs had maybe nicked her dogs ball or something) only to find that she was actually reprimanding us for allowing our dogs to play. We shrugged and told her not to worry and let them get on with things. They soon got bored and went their separate ways anyway.

WTF is it with some of these ladies and their ridiculous imaginary bond with dogs that allows them to feel that they alone can detect autism, fear and rage in dogs when other owners simply get on with their lives.

I've passed about a thousand blokes out with their dogs over the years. To a man we nod curtly, maybe mention the weather, then whistle or call our dogs to "hurry up and come on" while we go on our way. We don't judge others nor do we imagine some little 4 act play going on in our dogs heads and wind ourselves up over their feelings. They are just dogs. Walking.

I breath a mighty sigh of relief when I get to the woods/park and see it empty (or maybe the odd fella walking his hound). if I see a lady of a certain age with her dog on a lead I tend to head the other way. It's normally more trouble than it's worth.

Last edited by FredDibnah; 05-06-18 at 16:39.
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Dog licence. With test. It's the only way.
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+ 1 Had similar experiences.

My dogs (spanning 30years: Retriever, Collie cross, Collie, Corgi cross) are almost never on the lead, although the Corgi, in typical untrainable, wilfully disobedient Corgi fashion is on an extending lead more than the others but only because she is very inquisitive and investigates everyone and everything.

My pet hate is indeed dog owners who never let their dog off the lead. Do these cruel morons not realise they are torturing the poor thing.
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Don't like dogs...wouldn't harm one...just not my bag....now some of the owners i would like to harm.
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Don't like dogs...wouldn't harm one...just not my bag....now some of the owners i would like to harm.
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Dog licence. With test. It's the only way.
+1 and......

Expensive licence, tough test and big fines for the dodgy breeders.

Ban the Kennel Club, Crufts and all that pedigree, snobbish nonsense.
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Originally Posted by FredDibnah View Post
WTF is it with some of these ladies and their ridiculous imaginary bond with dogs that allows them to feel that they alone can detect autism, fear and rage in dogs when other owners simply get on with their lives.
You are unlikely to be bothered by the gorgeous dog-owning single lady I know who lives on the Surrey / Sussex border. The dog is rarely allowed out because it's introverted, and sometimes when it does go out she carries it. At the office she often refuses to work after 4pm because: "I have responsibilities - I have to go home to my dog."
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I'd love to know how you establish that a dog is autistic.

I also can't abide massively over-protective dog owners. It seems to me that dogs learn from interacting with other dogs. If they stick their hooter up another dog's jacksie and that dog bares its teeth and/or snarls, it's a sign that said the attention isn't welcome. If said dog continues to stick its hooter where the sun doesn't shine, it might get a nip for its trouble. It has just learned to recognise a sign from another dog. Next time it starts fussing around another dog and sees the warning sign, it might back off. (A few lessons may obviously be required.)

Where this happens, the philosophical dog owner will say "Well, he has to learn" and carry on with his dog walk. The lunatics will probably scream, grab their dog, put it on a lead, shout at the other dog, then begin checking every inch of their dog for injuries. That dog will become a nervous wreck because its owner goes hysterical every time anything goes near it.

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I can't believe you people are poo-pooing
the idea of dog autism.

Next you'll be ridiculing dog homeopathy and such.


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One of our neighbours has a dyslexic dog. It thinks it's God.
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I had to laugh when I read this thread, because it reminded me of a conversation I overheard whilst commuting up to London on the train.
Two women got on the stop after me, and were sitting in the seats behind me.
As one of the women started to speak - well dominate the conversation would be a more apt description, it soon became obvious that she was either on very strong, mind altering medication, or more likely - daft as a brush.
She proceeded to tell the other woman (although unknown to her, she had an amused audience as well), how she had taken her dog to the vet because she was convinced it was suffereing from either ADHD or Autism, because it wouldn't stop running around and barking when anyone knocked their door. Apart from this "undogly" behaviour, she then launched into the hilarious account of the nightmares which the dog had been having, which were caused, she said by flashbacks, and not just any flashbacks to an earlier time in the pooch's life, but to a previous life when the canine used to be a feline.
She finished up by telling the other woman, that she was going to see another vet, because she didn't think this one was taking her seriously.
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People really are stupid.
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Depends on the dog.

Our GSD has problems with strange dogs - she was bitten as a pup, and her going in impression is that "the strange dog is here to kill me". Once she gets to know other dogs, she's fine with them. She's always walked on the lead in public, both because of her slightly random behaviour with other dogs, and the fact that if she spots deer, she will be off over the horizon with zero chance of recall.

The problem usually comes with the mad women who have small dogs called "pookie" or "flossie". Their dogs are off the lead and out of control, and run straight at our dog. Ours tuns into full attack dog mode, which as she is a big GSD .... is a fairly fearsome sight. If small dog is in grabbing range, she will grab it, roll it over and stand on it. There is loads of noise and teeth, but no blood.

An experienced dog owner would recognise that 1) dogs do stuff like this and 2) they should probably have had their dog under control. The hysterical mob start claiming that our dog is a hazard to humans and world order ... and call the police. Plod don't care, they know there is nothing wrong with our dog... Maybe I should claim the dog has mental health issues and claim compo.
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Then there are the humans, when walking my Beagle on a leash, who treat him as though he is a rabies infected killer, if he dares approach, tail wagging enthusiastically in a gesture of friendliness. I don’t understand dog haters and it seems certain ethnic groups, more often than not, display these tendencies. I’ve often said to them there’s no rabies in Australia and Tobes doesn’t bite but it makes no difference.
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There is a serious problem with dog fear here.

People who are petrified of dog. Some say the usual "I was attacked when I was a kid" but for others it appears to be learned behaviour.

On the other hand there are the ones who let their kids run up screaming to stranger dog and stick their face right up to the dogs head. You never know... It's a dog....
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Mmm

Me thinks it's likely that these women in question are substituting pooches for babies...either ones they haven't had or ones that have flown ( fled ) the nest.

Hence the anthropomorphising and infantilizing of aforementioned pooches.

Projecting all sorts of non existent medical conditions onto the poor animal is likely a fair indicator of how they would or indeed have "parented" any offspring.

We have two cats we love to bits...and whilst acknowledging they have the capacity to feel love , fear, attachment and a whole range of complex emotions we are under no illusion that they are cats.


Some people are just nuts.

I pity the poor animal that gets an owner like that.

It's Busso time ..
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Originally Posted by keithyboy View Post
I also can't abide massively over-protective dog owners. It seems to me that dogs learn from interacting with other dogs. If they stick their hooter up another dog's jacksie and that dog bares its teeth and/or snarls, it's a sign that said the attention isn't welcome. If said dog continues to stick its hooter where the sun doesn't shine, it might get a nip for its trouble. It has just learned to recognise a sign from another dog. Next time it starts fussing around another dog and sees the warning sign, it might back off. (A few lessons may obviously be required.)

Where this happens, the philosophical dog owner will say "Well, he has to learn" and carry on with his dog walk. The lunatics will probably scream, grab their dog, put it on a lead, shout at the other dog, then begin checking every inch of their dog for injuries. That dog will become a nervous wreck because its owner goes hysterical every time anything goes near it.
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Depends on the dog.

Our GSD has problems with strange dogs - she was bitten as a pup, and her going in impression is that "the strange dog is here to kill me". Once she gets to know other dogs, she's fine with them. She's always walked on the lead in public, both because of her slightly random behaviour with other dogs, and the fact that if she spots deer, she will be off over the horizon with zero chance of recall.

The problem usually comes with the mad women who have small dogs called "pookie" or "flossie". Their dogs are off the lead and out of control, and run straight at our dog. Ours tuns into full attack dog mode, which as she is a big GSD .... is a fairly fearsome sight. If small dog is in grabbing range, she will grab it, roll it over and stand on it. There is loads of noise and teeth, but no blood.

An experienced dog owner would recognise that 1) dogs do stuff like this and 2) they should probably have had their dog under control. The hysterical mob start claiming that our dog is a hazard to humans and world order ... and call the police. Plod don't care, they know there is nothing wrong with our dog... Maybe I should claim the dog has mental health issues and claim compo.
Two sides of the same coin really.

In the hypothetical situation that Malcolm approached a big dog on a lead and he got rolled, then (a) I would say "teaches him a lesson" and (b) he would be unlikely to do it again. Win/Win.

Also depends on proximity.

If I'm in Richmond park and a fella with a big dog on a lead is 100 yards away and Malcolm runs off to approach it - then I'm not in control and said owner can happily get the hump.

If I'm on a river path and we pass each other - I'm not putting Malcolm on a lead every time I see someone coming with their dog on a lead, so the chances are he will try to make contact with a dog that's - say - 6 feet away. That's not me "not having my dog under control" that's just meeting other dogs.
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Two sides of the same coin really.

In the hypothetical situation that Malcolm approached a big dog on a lead and he got rolled, then (a) I would say "teaches him a lesson" and (b) he would be unlikely to do it again. Win/Win.

Also depends on proximity.

If I'm in Richmond park and a fella with a big dog on a lead is 100 yards away and Malcolm runs off to approach it - then I'm not in control and said owner can happily get the hump.

If I'm on a river path and we pass each other - I'm not putting Malcolm on a lead every time I see someone coming with their dog on a lead, so the chances are he will try to make contact with a dog that's - say - 6 feet away. That's not me "not having my dog under control" that's just meeting other dogs.
What you seem to be suggesting there is that different actions are necessary in different circumstances and that people should look at the situation, then use judgement and common sense to determine the best action. I know you've been deid a while and your brain is probably starved of oxygen but have you gone completely mad as well?
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Problem with letting ex racing Greyhounds off the lead is they will kill smaller dogs that are fluffy & the owners get a bit upset...I have one of these & the agreement is that we do not let him off the lead in a public place...how cruel I am perceived .
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Problem with letting ex racing Greyhounds off the lead is they will kill smaller dogs that are fluffy & the owners get a bit upset...I have one of these & the agreement is that we do not let him off the lead in a public place...how cruel I am perceived .
What's your ex racing Greyhound like when approached by a smaller dog? (said smaller dog approaching in a non-aggressive manner)?

Do you let them interact or does it wind your dog up as it's on a lead?

Genuine question by the way
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They have to be muzzled at all times & are OK stood still, its when little fluffy job starts running that it becomes a problem. Its their instinct & they have been trained from birth, you'll never get it out of them. On the other hand I have a Pup from one of the past racer's that mated with one of our Whippets. He is 10 now & loves all dogs & will run , well let the other dogs ( non racing breeds) catch him up, then in a very large arc gracefully pulls away from them whilst looking over his shoulder as they flag or just give up. He then goes back when they are led/sat there a pile of panting,shaking mess & proceeds to sniff them all over at will...he does not have an aggressive bone in his body...but the running is, once he see's a squirrel, rabbit nothing will stop him from chasing it...The black one has taken 3 wood pigeons as they are taking off ,about 4 -7 foot in air , many squirrels etc The fawn one , well hares have to have a good head start , it is a gentle animal though. On one occasion we were walking along & out of the braken came a deer already running they took off luckily I had the Black one on a leash, the the fawn one caught up with it after 20yds or so & the poor thing was petrified, I called out & the dog stood in front checking the deer, when it realized the deer was not moving they sniffed each other & he left the deer alone, just the chase or better still being chased. The black one is a Cross whippet & was not from our stock & had( passed now) a very determined nature so I am thankful he happened to be tethered at that time.
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