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Old 14-10-06
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Cutting off a rusted bolt

I need to cut off a rusted nut and bolt. WD40 and yanking aint shifting this one.

I have a drill - has anyone tried to use a drill cutter successfully?

Any other ideas?
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  #2 (Post Link)  
Old 14-10-06
harrythesnotgobbler
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Put a pilot hole down the middle of the nut/bolt then follow with a drill of equal size to the bolt shank, assuming its not in a threaded hole it should fall or punch out when the bolt head or nut is off.
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Old 14-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

The only rider to Harry's advice is that you only need go in a couple of millimeters with the pilot hole, and if it's a high tensile bolt you'll need a special bit......
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Old 15-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

If you've got access to the nut, a nut splitter is probably the best way of doing it.

You could try using a proper penetrating oil, such as PlusGas!
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Old 16-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Cruder, but you could angle grind it if there is safe access.
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Old 16-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Where is the bolt?
Is it a bolt or screw? (Thread goes all the way to the head on a screw)
What material & grade? Eg 5, 8.8, 10.9 or 12.9, Stainless A2-70, A4-80 etc
What dia & length?
What's it screwing into?
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Old 16-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Originally Posted by JamesG
Where is the bolt?
Is it a bolt or screw? (Thread goes all the way to the head on a screw)
What material & grade? Eg 5, 8.8, 10.9 or 12.9, Stainless A2-70, A4-80 etc
What dia & length?
What's it screwing into?
Cheers guys. I have accepting defeat, but it is for a MX5 (my second car - long story, I work away so have a car in each city and fly / take the train to work). For the sake of £40 taken it to a local garage as I want to be on the safe side - it is droplink for the front arb. Bloody frustrating as I know exactly what to do, but just did not have enough clearance from my 18" ramp to get enough purchase on the ratchet. I did help the garage though with a mountain of penetrating oil!
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Old 17-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

One thing that irritates me is the use of poor fastners by manufacturers. It makes a big difference on the life cylcle cost of the product if you consider the time people waste removing seized or poorly conceived fastners. So simple to get right too.

For example.
Castellated nut & split pin - effective & secure but time consuming
Philidas (bent beam) - OK for static applications only
Nylock - bad
Schnorr - good but can damage soft materials
Nordlock - very good but relatively expensive

The number of times i've seen a zinc plated nylock used on a bronze zinc plate (BZP) screw makes me want to weep. Why do it??? In general, it amazes me how often designers select the wrong fastner and / or locking system - and then can manage to get the material compatability totally wrong...

Why use 10.9 grade bolts (HT steel with propensity for stress corrosion cracking) when a slightly larger 8.8 grade bolt will work???

That's the good thing about restoring your own car, you can bin the lot and do the job properly!
My advice, buy a box of M8 & M10 Nordlocks and source your bolts direct from a decent supplier who can supply to BS3692 (for 8.8 grade) or BS4192 (for 10.9 or 12.9 HT bolts). Any 10.9 or 12.9 fastners, check for a proper de-embrittlement cert referring to BS1706. Match bolt, washer & nut materials & finishes. Matched BZP (BS3382) or grey drab ZP for bolt & nut. Do this and you should never need to worry about seized bolts or failed joints.
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Old 18-10-06
427scr
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

[QUOTE=JamesG]One thing that irritates me is the use of poor fastners by manufacturers. QUOTE]

This is the beauty of building your own car.

See my significant other..........

Over the past 10 years, I have swapped all of the un-stressed fasteners for stainless. Cost a fortune, but makes service that much more enjoyable.

All of the structural fasteners are lathered with copper grease, during and after assembly. Messy to do and to work on later, but no rusted fixings.

By the way, best thing for getting stuck nuts off is an angle grinder with a 1mm blade in it. They are hard to find and expensive, but talk about hot knife and butter and they don't heat up the surrounding area too much........A locksmith friend of mine put me on to them, he uses them for cutting padlocks in half.
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Old 18-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Originally Posted by JamesG
My advice, buy a box of M8 & M10 Nordlocks and source your bolts direct from a decent supplier who can supply to BS3692 (for 8.8 grade) or BS4192 (for 10.9 or 12.9 HT bolts). Any 10.9 or 12.9 fastners, check for a proper de-embrittlement cert referring to BS1706. Match bolt, washer & nut materials & finishes. Matched BZP (BS3382) or grey drab ZP for bolt & nut. Do this and you should never need to worry about seized bolts or failed joints.

Sounds a bit techie...

What's wrong with putting stainless steel anywhere that can go rusty (my preferred tactic)?


Ralf S.
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Old 18-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Originally Posted by JamesG
One thing that irritates me is the use of poor fastners by manufacturers.
Accountants over-rule engineers!
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Old 18-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Managed to bust a nut splitter at the weekend!!!

Designed for 12-16mm nuts so working at the max. Split two nuts at top of ARB droplinks but wouldn't cut completely through lower ones. Eventually the end of the cutting piece where it meets the threaded part collapsed!! Got my money back though.

In the end I cut the side off the lower nuts in two places with a junior hacksaw and removed the remains with a hammer and small chisel. Took longer but just as effective. Don't think the lower nuts were a different material but who knows.

There wouldn't have been room for an angle grinder or a hacksaw for the top nuts as these are behind the strut so the splitter was the only real option. The usual problem of the threaded bolt turning and unable to get a hex key or torx bit to hold it. No real room for sockets due to the position of other parts ie brake pipes. The lowers were easier to get at. This was on a Peugeot 206, but I've also had to do the 156 droplinks and that was a hacksaw job too.


cheers, Gary

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Old 18-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Thats one thing that surprised me, most of the nuts and bolts on my alfa seemed better than the average used on most cars. Apart from the ones holding the undertray, and a couple on the exhaust system, they all seemed to come off pretty effortlessly.

Now finally I know what 8.8 means, seen it on so many nuts and always wondered how they were the same size.
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Old 19-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Originally Posted by Dave Brand
Accountants over-rule engineers!
Unfortunately this is often true (though i enjoy being able to tell them to f@*k off whenever i have a saftey related issue) and is why most things don't work as well as they could; from your kettle to your car - or even the trains & 'planes you use...

As for why Stainless Steel fastners aren't used everywhere, there are several reasons.

Firstly is obviously cost. This is, however, not entirely true since low stressed stainless bolts could be re-used whereas corroded steel bolts need to be binned.

Secondly, and most importantly, is the Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) of SS is lower than a steel alloy. The A4-80 is equivalent(ish) to an 8.8 grade bolt, but you then have 10.9 & 12.9 grade alloy steel bolts. 10.9 & 12.9 are classed as high strength steel alloy and require more care in use, but you can apply MUCH more load. For example you can torque an M8 8.8 grade bolt to 30Nm whereas a 12.9 grade will take 50Nm. In general you're looking at 70% more applied torque.

Thirdly is material compatability. If you clamp steel components with stainless fastners you get a galvanic reaction and resultant corrosion.

Fourth is that SS fastners have lower fatigue life than steel

Fifth is the galling effect of SS fastners can resist tightening and give false clamping loads for a given indicated torque applied. (Fit with anti-seize copper grease and use 10% less torque)

Otherwise they're great...

(Off to find an accountant to kick )

James
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Old 20-10-06
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Re: Cutting off a rusted bolt

Originally Posted by JamesG
Unfortunately this is often true (though i enjoy being able to tell them to f@*k off whenever i have a saftey related issue)
Been there, done that!
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