Swirl flaps How To and MAF clean How To anywhere? 159 1.9 - Page 12 - Alfa Romeo Forum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Resolution View Post
How tight should the heater plugs on reinstall? Nothing on eLearn, it just quotes "Place the heater plugs back in there housing and tighten them."
https://www.ngk.de/en/technology-in-...orrect-torque/

This should help. Sorry I can't be more specific, can't get on autodata at the moment.
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Iv not attempted using the crank locking tool yet. So I will do that or test it before installing the recon head.
Does the Aux belt have to be removed? I'm 99% sure it does. I'm just looking confirmation.
At a quick glance also, it looks like the service crank pulley is fitted with Ribe bolts? Am I correct? If I am, bloody typical?
Yeah you need to take off the auxiliary belt driving pulley to fit the crank locking tool and to fit the new timing belt. It is Ribe bolts which hold on the aux crank pulley.
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Great news on the Ribe. Off to buy that set from Halfords now, cant keep borrowing off my mechanic mate as im sure he getting annoyed. But at least ill have everything i need to service the cam belt in future.

Thanks Pud, for info and link. much appreciated. Quite surprized not torque setting on eLearn for a component like the heater plugs.
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Heater plugs don't need to be particularly tight. Just a nip with a 1/4"drive ratchet would be enough. The thinnest smear of copperslip on the threads will help them come out nicely in future.
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It's wet and cold, so just out of interest I thought I'd have a(nother) look at ePer to see if I could find out any more about that bracket. I eventually found it this time. It looks like there are 4 bolts, 2 of which are really awkward, and removal is definitely rather '****** that sh*t unless the engine is out'. Er, no.
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Today's efforts. Held up by a few issues. First time removing auxiliary belt to start things off took a while to work out. Wanted to make sure on the timing, how the timing tool worked etc.
Painted the fuel pump bracket. I did this without removing it from the car so had to clean area, prep and mask off everything before painting which also took some time so to avoid stray spray paint going over everything else. Also used a heat gun to warm spray tins, bracket and to assist with drying as the obviously February weather is not ideal temperature conditions. I feel doing this bit of extra paintwork completes the detailing with the cam cover once all assembled together.
Also took a while to clean out all the head bolt holes, even though I had my improvised cleaning kit, it worked well but still took time.
Also realised, only when I got to the point of fitting the water pump that i have no water pump gasket so I could not reassemble the belts.
My last 2 hours today were spent trying to get new hose clips to tighten. Mainly the small lowest hose on the thermostat as it's super awkward to get down at and the hose clips that I bought keep breaking. They had not even got tight on the hose surface and the threads or screw would mess up and make that clip a dud. Tried five time wasting five clips without success so will buy more tomorrow from somewhere else. Clips I bought where from screwfix, multipack. I don't think they any good.
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Last edited by Resolution; 14-02-16 at 20:14.
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Gasket unknowns. Either in FAO Ned or anyone that can help. With the set of gaskets I have been sent all of the below are unknowns and unused (so far).

The valve gasket (16x) on the top left of plastic are not required correct?

The copper washer? Had another 4x, slightly thicker washers for the injectors that have been used.

The brown metal ring?

The thick black rubber ring?

The thin black rubber ring?

Can anyone identify this and tell me where they go? None came off the part I removed like these.

Can anyone tell me where to buy a water pump gasket only as I'm reusing my pump as it's practically new?
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I have just read a little into gasket seal in a tube. Can I reuse the original water pump gasket and apply some gasket seal?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halftone View Post
It'll be good to give the turbo oil feed pipe a good flush through with brake cleaner. As I mentioned, Ned said to discard the gauze filter at the block banjo fitting as it clogs up and restricts oil feed to the turbo, and that kills the turbo.
Even though I completely stripped the turbo i still did not come across a Gauze filter. Where am I looking for it?
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I've not looked for the gauze filter yet, Ned said where the banjo for the feed pipe connects. "Fish it out" he said. Which implies it's within the hole in the block.

Your engine is looking like an engine again I've made no further progress beyond trying to clean up the exhaust and turbo shields. I'm stuck due to funds and now a cold/sneezing every 30 sec.

To try and answer your gasket queries: yes, the 16 valve oil seals are redundant, since the recon head will already have new ones fitted. Don't really know about the rest, but at least one of the 'spare' oil seals will live behind the camshaft pulley. Neither of us have needed to dismantle the cams from the cambox, so it isn't required. The large skinny O-ring looks vaguely familiar, but I couldn't tell you from where now. I was expecting to work out what went where when reassembling but I haven't started that yet.

I believe the 4 copper washers are injector seals, and the (single?) smaller one will likely be for the turbo oil feed banjo.

You could possibly get away with reusing the waterpump gasket if it isn't torn, with or without a thin skin of gasket cement like Blue Hylomar or silicone RTV. Alternatively buy some gasket material locally and cut one out with a scalpel using your old one as a template. Motor spares shops quite often stock various thicknesses and types. Just pick a material similar to what's there (just normal gasket paper IIRC).

Last edited by halftone; 15-02-16 at 00:59.
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Incidentally, you know about ePer? Online parts catalogue, and almost more use than eLearn for seeing how bits go together...
http://212.41.221.85:7081
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The gauze filter is inside the banjo bolt which holds the turbo's oil feed supply pipe to the block.
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I will have a look for it today.

Once I get this all back together and all the fluids in, what precautions and procedures do I need to follow before I start the ignition? (Reminders to any notes to follow, I'm a complete novice learning as I go)

I have used ePer thanks halftone, although really been following eLearn and advise in here.
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Still looking for this gauze filter. I'm going to need someone to say, "dduuuuhhh, there it is."

Banjo bolt?? Is that the one that is in the engine block at the moment (safe place as not to loose it)

Ah, iv googled banjo bolt, it is that one. I'll take it out and see what the gauze looks like. It holds the oil pipe on the second image.
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Turn the engine over with the injector leads disconnected until you get oil pressure light out on the dash.
Turn the heater on full and leave the cap off the header tank, this is to allow airlocks in the coolant to clear (I don't think there is a coolant bleed screw on this car - unless anyone knows better?).
Then reconnect injector wires and start. May take a bit of cranking for fuel to get through the HP lines.
Expect alarming top end rattling from the lifters, until they pump up. Any other abnormal noises need investigating.
Let it idle until warm, checking for oil, air, exhaust and water leaks.
Replace the header tank cap when the car gets to 90C, but before it boils. By then the thermostat will have opened and water circulation hopefully cleared any airlocks in the pipes.
Expect smoke from VHT paint curing. This can be quite a lot and last 10-20mins, and may continue to stink a bit for days.
Turn it off, then check fluid levels again. Check again for leaks, eg dropping oil.
Should now be OK to drive cautiously. Check brakes OK (you may get a bit of noise from rusty disks from standing, for a few secs). Check power steering OK. Check handbrake hasn't seized on from standing. After that, drive and check turbo operation.

You'll hopefully find a bit more power than when you had several valves leaking from swirl flap damage.

Remember that with the EGR blanked but no adjustment to the ECU maps, the MCSF light will come on at some point and an EGR failure code get stored.

That's it really. There's no run-in requirement with a recon head. Just keep a close eye on oil and coolant levels for a few days until you're confident all is normal. Probably a good idea to read the codes too, just to make sure no other codes are being hidden by the expected EGR-derived MCSF.

Last edited by halftone; 15-02-16 at 16:01.
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heres a close up of gauze in banjo bolt, without knowing its there you might miss its a fine mesh.
Copy of turbo removal march 2012 031.jpg

turbo removal march 2012 034.jpg

turbo removal march 2012 033.jpg
jtd micro filter oil line.png
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Thanks for the info and picture on the banjo bolt.

Thanks for the start up procedure halftone. Seems simple enough but wouldn't of had a clue without the given knowledge. Thanks you.

Have you installed your head yet halftone? If not, inspect your head very very carefully. I washed and scrubbed mine with gunk degreaser and also power washed it carefully. I noticed 2-3 small alloy shavings fall from it before and after washing and when dried. I'm guessing they came from the machining process to skim the surface. They were large enough to be very concerned about if I didn't find them as they would be floating around the coolant or oil system if I had just put the recon head straight on.
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Ah, no, and no. A nice bright day wasted on work and snot. Another occasion when an airline would be indispensable, and about the 500th time I've wished I had a compressor.

It is really difficult to get all the swarf out of stuff that has been machined yet is full of cavities.

Oilways matter most because they are often tiny and can block if there is debris. Abrasives are bad for obvious reasons. I'd hope the recon guy was fastidious about those. They are very hard for amateurs to clean out, most of us lack a recirculating parts washer and an airline.

TBH I'd not worry about a few curls of alloy in waterways. No potential for harm really - they'll just flush out and settle in the bottom of the radiator.

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A little progress today in the 3hrs daylight I managed to grab:
  • why do people mullah sump plugs then put them back so they're a much bigger problem to the next victim?
  • if you leave the old oil cartridge draining into the waste oil container, don't leave it over the hole the oil goes through, because when you do finally get the sump plug out, the flood of oil can't drain into the container and will immediately overflow a pint of filth onto the road before you notice, giving you a 20minute clean-up job before the neighbours see.
  • that filter in the turbo banjo bolt is a tricky thing to get out. It is super fine, fragile gauze with plastic at each end. Couldn't get it out with a pick, had to destroy it with a drill then be very careful to get all the bits out. If you can't see shiny brass at the end, there's still a lump of plastic there that's capable of blocking the oil to the turbo.
  • there must be a better way to get oil and water out of the cylinder head bolt holes in the block than my bit of wire with kitchen towel wrapped round it. At least 30 strips of paper towel.

It was just one of those days when everything took far too long but had to be done. Head on next.
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Today was a long one. Everything is pretty much done. I've just a few hose clips to get. Had a pain in the arse with the cheap bag of clips I bought, big lesson learnt there. I've also got to attach the catalyst to the manifold. Made a boob as I should of attached it to the manifold before fitting the manifold and turbo. Then an oil change. I have never changed one of these types of filters before. Just the metal screw on type. So I will do my best to figure this type out.
Other than that everything is done. Did the banjo bolt. Awkward as you said. Coolant is in. Timing is done, belts are in place. Electrics all in place. Fuel lines all in. Pictures below are when I had daylight. I carried on working with a flood light until midnight.
Oh, another thing, that stupid bracket that holds the oil catch tank thing at the back is a nightmare. Dropped the lowest fixing bolt trying to squeeze my arm down to fit it. Took 45mins to recover it. I also don't like that large alloy bracket that's meant to come off to do the timing belt properly (debatable whether it needs to come off at all) because the bolts holding it on are impossible to access. Nightmare access all over.
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Dropped bolts are such a pain. I have a gooseneck magnetic pick-up tool, it's my best friend - similar to this. I expect I'll make good use of it over the next few days.
Sealey AK6532 Flexible Magnetic Pick-Up Tool 1kg Capacity: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools

You can actually see your alternator! That's where the steering pump is on mine. My alternator is almost invisible, from top or bottom, tucked right down by the steering rack with the subframe hiding it.

There are lots of different types of tools for removing oil filter cartridges, but what works depends on access. On my 147 with the filter at the front, this type worked best (I have a small collection of the things) Halfords Advanced Professional Oil Filter Removal Band - but mine cost under half what Halfords charge. I think from Mister Auto. Depends if you have room for the handle on the 159. Sometimes brutality is the best option, just hammer a big screwdriver through the tin and turn.

Kudos for doing the timing. I've read the procedure and still don't understand how the hell I'm supposed to adjust the tensioner by aligning a slot I can't see. But it must be possible.

You'll take that timing peg out of the cam cover before cranking it, of course you will...
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Dropped bolts are such a pain. I have a gooseneck magnetic pick-up tool, it's my best friend - similar to this. I expect I'll make good use of it over the next few days.
Sealey AK6532 Flexible Magnetic Pick-Up Tool 1kg Capacity: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools

You can actually see your alternator! That's where the steering pump is on mine. My alternator is almost invisible, from top or bottom, tucked right down by the steering rack with the subframe hiding it.

There are lots of different types of tools for removing oil filter cartridges, but what works depends on access. On my 147 with the filter at the front, this type worked best (I have a small collection of the things) Halfords Advanced Professional Oil Filter Removal Band - but mine cost under half what Halfords charge. I think from Mister Auto. Depends if you have room for the handle on the 159. Sometimes brutality is the best option, just hammer a big screwdriver through the tin and turn.

Kudos for doing the timing. I've read the procedure and still don't understand how the hell I'm supposed to adjust the tensioner by aligning a slot I can't see. But it must be possible.

You'll take that timing peg out of the cam cover before cranking it, of course you will...
You can lever the tensioner out with a pry bar (screwing a bolt into the block a little lower down gives you something to lever off), as you lever the tensioner out the pointer will move around, when it gets to the hole, nip up the tensioner bolt and that is job done (for now). Then remove locking tools, turn the engine over a good few times, re-fit the locking tools to make sure everything lines up still, then check the tensioner pointer is still in the right place.

Big kudos to Resolution for doing this on his own, its quite tricky to lever the tensioner out and nip the bolt up on your own, a second pair of hands makes this much easier.

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I used a magnetic tip long shaft screwdriver to get the bolt. Problem is once you stick your arm in you cant see what ur doing, even worst in the dark with a flood light single light source. Swear box came into great use. I think the neighbours used there's too to catch them too.

Your alternator sounds like a right beach.

Tool for removing oil filter cartridge? I was expecting the plastic housing the filter is inside to simply have a cap you undo and the cartridge pulls out. I'm guessing that's not the case.
With other cars iv done an oil/filter change, iv run the motor to circulate and warm the oil, jack it up, pull out the sump plug and catch the oil. Once dripping has extinguish I'd removed the metal screw on type filter, which would also have oil in and would drip alittle from its location. Clean up area and put new filter on, sump screw and and fresh oil. Depending on access with the metal type filters, if you could get two hands on them, I could sometimes remove buy hand but if not I'd use this type of tool picture below. If I need a tool would this type do the job for the 1.9jtdm. Does the whole housing need removed for the filter then to be pulled out? I'm abit confused. Iv not had a good look at it yet.

With the timing, I locked the crank and cams, then when installing the HP fuel pump pulley, I used that to adjust the belt and leverage it into place. Not the correct procedure I know but worked. I did install the aux belt incorrectly, wrong path around the pulleys, but double checked obviously and luckily sported it. Triple checking everything is a long winded process but clearly worth it. Sorted now.

Cams locking tool out, don't worry. I'm sure someone there has made that mistake though.
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Even though iv broken the rule book fitting the timing belt, iv turned the engine over two dozen times and it all lines up nicely.
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Sorry, I may be talking rubbish about filter removal tools. My 147 has a disposable metal cartridge filter. I forgot the 159 has a filter in a housing, like they all used to c.1965

In other words I know nothing about filter change on a 159 JTD. A forum search would probably find info.

Last edited by halftone; 17-02-16 at 12:45.
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