Swirl flaps How To and MAF clean How To anywhere? 159 1.9 - Page 11 - Alfa Romeo Forum
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I did think about keeping the MAP as a spare and selling the rest if possible, but I didn't have any problems or logged codes with the existing one so it's cash I'd rather throw into other parts of the AR money pit. If it does play up in the future, it's one easily accessible screw to change it.

Nobody's showed any interest, so I'm putting the whole thing on eBay tomorrow at a lower start price. I don't expect it to spark a bidding war, there can't be many AR diesel owners who'd want it. You are welcome to consider it as a cheap new 60-ish Bosch MAP sensor with a free manifold, gasket and actuator attached

I did the freeing off of hydraulic lifters earlier. There's a bit of a knack. Of course they are designed to go solid when squeezed rapidly, so squeezing them in a vice you have to take it slow - squeeze a bit, leave a few secs, squeeze a bit more, repeat until the inner part is fully depressed into the outer sleeve. At that point there is no more inner shiny surface visible,and thereafter they can be worked by hand in brake cleaner. The gunge comes out of the hole in the ball at the top, and can't if you place your finger over the hole to work them. I used a washer as a collar to avoid that and have now left them to soak as I have to cook.
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(Post Link) post #252 of 410 Old 07-02-16 Thread Starter
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Iv just detached all the rockets from them today. Wipe the rocker as clean as I can. Are they worth soaking in brake fluid and then dipping in new oil once done?

The lifters I can see are two parts, the smaller cylinder with the ball head, this part can rotate freely inside the larger cylinder. How much force needs to be applied to drain the oil from them and where does it come out? How far can they be compressed as I don't want to over force they? A little bit at a time, waiting a few seconds, and a little bit again and so on I understand. I see no reason to remover the clip from the lifters (even if it's possible) would I be right? I don't have a vice, would you think there is any other way of compressing them safely with out the use of a vice?
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If your lifters are sticky you wont be able to compress them noticeably by hand. The little end, with the ball, should be able to be pushed into the body about 2-2.5mm - when fully pushed home you won't be able to see any of the bright machined surface below the ball part.

The lifters just snap out of (and into) the rockers easily, just by hand.

They are designed so that under oil pressure they pump up to just the right height to form a solid support for the end of the rocker, with the correct amount of free play. But sludge inside means they stay solid so don't adjust readily. To unstick them you have to compress them in a vice. If you try and wind it on hard and quickly they resist, but a little at a time gets them moving.

I used a bit of folded rag in the vice jaws, so as not to mark the machined ends and to allow gunge to be expelled. A metal surface might seal the hole in the ball end and prevent it being squeezed out easily.

I think once you actually try it, you'll quickly get the feel of how much pressure and how fast. You'll find the vice goes tight at moderate pressure, then a second or two later you can apply more pressure because the inner part has relaxed some. Once you can see no more of the 'bright metal' ring at the ball end, the lifters are fully compressed and job done. You'll then find they are now easy to compress with finger pressure against their internal spring.

Wash all the bits in brake cleaner to remove sludge and grit, then let them dry. Oil them well before putting them back in the head. The roller bearings on the rockers need oil, all contact points, and the wells the lifters sit in. But not until after the head and new gasket are bolted down, else oil might just run through the oil holes in the head to the gasket area and might prevent a good seal.
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(Post Link) post #254 of 410 Old 08-02-16 Thread Starter
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Cylinder head order from Ned. So hoping the end is in sight. Also ordered a torque wrench, which I may need some advice with, and a small vice to release the lifters. Ned said soak them in Diesel 24hrs, I'm guessing brake cleaner will do the same job. I have access to break cleaner or petrol at the moment, without buying a minimum of 5 litres of diesel. If diesel will be the best I will fill a Jerry as it won't go to waste.
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Diesel has lubricant and solvent properties, which will be useful until they refill with oil. Ditto ATF.

Brake cleaner will strip oil, so would petrol, acetone etc, so if you use those you must soak or pump them in fresh oil before reinstating. 2 steps instead of one.

Ned's professionally focussed on doing the job efficiently and fast. With you and I, acceptable speed for even a one-armed apprentice would have got us sacked weeks ago
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Ned's professionally focussed on doing the job efficiently and fast. With you and I, acceptable speed for even a one-armed apprentice would have got us sacked weeks ago
Yer you 2 would have been sacked by now

We would normally expect to get one of these turned round in one and a half days ish depending on the damage

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(Post Link) post #257 of 410 Old 08-02-16 Thread Starter
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Thanks for highlighting that Ned. day and a half.

Even though I'm outa work at the minute. Being one car down and having to take my wife to and from work everyday, also get 2 of my kids sorted for school as they 6yrs and 4yrs, take them too school and collect them, look after a 2yr old through the day as I have no child care, be limited with working conditions as car is on the street being worked on (wind, rain, daylight etc), a limited budget and when I can use it, and to top it with a limited mechanical knowledge were I have never undertaking anything like this before...I'm pretty proud of myself getting this far. Wouldn't have done it without the help here. Top Job everyone.
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Look on the bright side. Unlike someone doing this for a living, we're able to look out the window at the car sat in the horizontal rain this morning and think 'not today then'.

You are doing well. This is by any standards a complicated engine, with some interesting access puzzles. In at the deep end alright. And it's a valuable insight to just how good and knowledgeable pro technicians have to be to do this stuff quickly and accurately. Those hydraulic lifters would have gone straight in the bin at a lot of garages, with the customer being told they had to be replaced. I've seen Chinese versions on sale at 7 each, AR probably charge 2-3x that. Times 16. Erk.
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Just finished squeezing them. Well, first run anyway. Had them in brake cleaner about 4hrs, squeezed them in the vice (rubber gripped and rag to protect with a handy nut keeping the hole on top clear) so they were completely compressed. Then back into the brake cleaner, squeezing them in their by hand, then all back in fresh brake cleaner to soak again, overnight this time. Noticed squeezing them by handle after this 1st clean that some compressed easier and further than others which is why iv decided to soak again as it was only 4hrs to start with. Not sure in I seen much in the description of gunge that was quoted as a description previouslyl. One had a few lumpy bits but that's all iv noticed so far.

Overall happy so far with a job I never thought of doing or thought needed done.
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Don't expect the same sort of hardened gunge found in the inlet manifold. Oil sludge is a mud of gum, water, acids, metallic particles and fine carbon that will settle out of the used oil over the life of the car so far, causing the lifter's internal operation to be sticky. My lifters were externally clean and nothing much came out when compressing them, but the brake cleaner I soaked them in was filthy with dissolved sludge by the time I'd finished.
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(Post Link) post #261 of 410 Old 09-02-16 Thread Starter
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Quality service Ned. Thank you.

Vitamin C is to keep me going.
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Spent this evening perfecting the stud removal technique using two nuts. Not all the studs with the recon unit for the exhaust manifold or the cam cover so exchanged from my old one. Wish I knew this technique before I hacked off a stud for the HP fuel pump to get the manifold off. Still havnt attempted getting the remains of that out yet, but I got a couple of replacement studs from Italia Auto Part on eBay ready to do that job.
Also scotch padded around all the gasket areas with brake cleaner on the recon head so all ready.

All the lifters n rockers cleaned, degunged, lubricated in new oil. Still to clean down top of piston area on engine block for a new head gasket. While car is up on axle stands, iv read enough to convince me to drill a few holes in the DPF core.

Possible mountain outa a mole hill this project has become but it's worth it.
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Dry weather today, spent and hr preparing and cleaning the block service. Not touched the piston tops or piston walls yet. Here is a before and after ****. Used a glass scraper to start and scotch pads to finish with a combo of PlusGas and brake cleaner.
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Shiny Don't forget to soak up oil/water out of the bolt holes before you put the head back on, else they'll hydraulic lock.

Work stuff intruding here. I am self-(un)employed.
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I'm just working out the best custom made tool I can put together to clean and mop up inside the head bolt holes. Do the head bolts need a smear any copper grease or fresh oil (very light I'm sure if any)?

Did a job I was dreading today. I finally got a 9mm deep socket to get the glow plugs out. Nothing to worry about what so ever, very easy out. I Did soak the threads last few day though with PlusGas so possibly helped. Heard horror stories of them snapping so wasn't looking forward to do it.
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Lightly oiled threads vs. copper grease on the head bolts is a disputed issue. Some argue that copper grease will mess up torque settings. I don't believe that personally. Torque at these high levels is mostly bolt stretch not friction at the threads, and the difference between CG and oil will be minimal. I have used copper grease on head bolts into aluminium crankcases on motorcycles, because there were the beginnings of corrosion that might destroy the thread which would be very bad. Never had a problem since. But the JTD bolts are into an iron block, the shanks aren't tight in the alloy head, and I saw no corrosion at all with mine. I'll use a wipe of oil.

Only progress I've made today is masking and spraying the rusty exhaust manifold and cast-iron part of the catalyst with silver VHT. It probably won't last 3months, but after your posh red effort I was too ashamed to leave it in its rusty state.

Oh, and I checked the formerly-sticky VVT actuation on my turbo with a vacuum pump. It now contracts progressively from almost no vacuum, hitting the stop at ~440mm(17")/Hg. This seems fine. Full movement range of the actuator (without the stop) is specced at 0-20"/Hg I think. Before I cleaned the turbo it was stopping ~1cm short of the stop.

If your turbo was fine before, there's no need to do this. I just felt I had to check it really was the rust I removed that had caused my problem, not the actuator itself sticking.
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My wife may have the perfect solution for cleaning and mopping up the head bolt holes from her workplace. Wish I asked her sooner. I'll post a picture tomorrow evening if she gets it.

I can't stand rusty, dull, rough pieces of metal. So detailing the engine parts just seemed logical to do while the engine apart. I owned a Ford Mondeo ST200 a few years back which has the 2.5L V6. Rather than a painted engine on that car, I detailed it in custom made stainless steel parts to match a custom chromed air intake manifold same as the one in the attached image below. So you can probably see where I get my eye for it from.
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Havnt a clue how to do a vacuum test or what tools are required to do that sort of thing. Is this the kind of thing can do it? And is there any point me doing it?
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(Post Link) post #269 of 410 Old 11-02-16 Thread Starter
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Head bolt hole cleaning n mopping tool set
Normal size cotton bud at the bottom.
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I never put stuff back dirty or rusty, but signs of age are OK with me. Looking in the mirror, I've not much choice.

I wouldn't go buying a vacuum gauge unless/until there's reason to think you need it. Those Chinese ones work OK. I used one like it, but only because it was the only way to ensure my actuator wasn't contributing to the limited vane movement.

I only got an hour of daylight today to spend on this. Cleaned the block surface and then had a more thorough look at how to get the alternator off. I still couldn't figure out how the HP fuel pump bracket is held to the block, except possibly one or more bolts through the back. There's such a rats nest of brackets, bolts, pipes I couldn't figure out in a mirror+torch WTF was what. Quite likely there's a load more dismantling in the way, eg power steering pump. That quickly turned into 'why the hell am I thinking about doing this anyway?'. More checking of the alternator ensued. Yep, the alternator bearings are smooth as silk and the one-way clutch is smooth and one-way, with no fault that I can find.

Regular readers will know this all started with a nasty rattle, and I set out to fix the rattle, which eventually seemed to be from 'something' on the auxiliary belt - either the alternator pulley, or crank pulley, maybe a tensioner or idler.
I was expecting to change the alternator, or at least replace its pulley and bearings, and expecting it to come out easy through the top with the inlet manifold off. The plan was to fit a brand-new manifold before the swirl flaps fell off the existing one. It didn't quite work out like that.

I've found nothing wrong with any of the aux belt stuff, nor timing belt. Instead, missing swirl flaps and head damage with bent valves. Yet the engine seemed to run OK, aside from that low-rev rattle that came and went...

I've got this all wrong from the start. I now wonder if the rattle was the top end damage all along, either direct or indirect - perhaps the less than smooth running causing the aux belt bits to make a noise. Perhaps the noise was the top end all along.

Anyway, the alternator seems fine, and easy it isn't, so I think I'll let it be and just get the thing back together and run it without the aux belt to see whether the rattle has gone. If it has, I'll put the new aux belt stuff in and see where that gets me. If it is the alternator after all, then I'll have to deal with that later, from underneath.

Yes, I know, could be the aircon pump etc, the HP pump, but I've had a good listen to them, they sound healthy enough.

So unless a resident expert says "ah, but alternator pulleys can rattle horribly even though there's no sign of wear or the one-way failing" I am just going to start putting the engine back together next.

That's today's plan anyhow.
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Your bolt hole cleaning kit is very superior. I'd post a pic of mine but it's just a bit of wire with some rag wrapped round it. Don't think there's much muck in there anyway, though after all this time there could be mice.
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Don't know if this helps. I had a look at getting that bracket out because I thought Ned suggested it being the best way to get the intake manifold off, and as iv painted the cam cover ideally I'd like to paint that bracket too as it would complete the finish up the edge where the cam belt runs. Had this emailed to me from an Alfa dismantlers.

Sounds like a bum deal compared to my project even though very similar. I hope putting it all back together is all it needs.
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Thanks, but I think I've persuaded myself not to try and fix what seems not to be broken anyway.

I forgot to mention the no-longer-wanted new inlet manifold/actuator/gasket/MAP sensor, on eBay
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/161974503945
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How tight should the heater plugs on reinstall? Nothing on eLearn, it just quotes "Place the heater plugs back in there housing and tighten them."
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Iv not attempted using the crank locking tool yet. So I will do that or test it before installing the recon head.
Does the Aux belt have to be removed? I'm 99% sure it does. I'm just looking confirmation.
At a quick glance also, it looks like the service crank pulley is fitted with Ribe bolts? Am I correct? If I am, bloody typical?
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