Couple issues - 156, 2.0 TSPARK -99 - Page 2 - Alfa Romeo Forum
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(Post Link) post #26 of 48 Old 07-10-16 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Henrik_45 View Post
The best to see if your thermostat is ok is to start your car from cold at let it idle.
Open the bonnet and feel the temperature on the top hose from the thermostat to the radiator.
It should feel cold until the thermostat opens and then the hose should be warm quickly.
If it slowly warms up, your thermostat it stuck open and need to be replaced.

The resistor for your car has p/n 51736774 according to ePER

Nice tip! Will check that out before I even try to replace it
The ebay link had that p/n in the description, seems about right.

In the picture attached, is it the RED, YELLOW or ORANGE hose? (Sorry for being dumb)
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Red.

If you have water in the orange hose there is a big problem.
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Red.

If you have water in the orange hose there is a big problem.

Oh yeah no water in the air hose to the MAF me no like
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Nope. It got hot slowly and slowly. Wasn't like having your hand on ice and then on a hot stove. It slowly builded heat
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It is not surprising the thermostat is history. Fixing it means the heater works sooner and hotter when required, the engine is more economical and burns less oil, and as the season cools you will find more power too.
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Now this is how my low speed fan resistor looks like. Clearly it has seen better days. I have nothing to test its resistance with. Seems like I have to order an new one.
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Now this is how my low speed fan resistor looks like. Clearly it has seen better days. I have nothing to test its resistance with. Seems like I have to order an new one.
The resistor don't look burnt

Have you tried to connect the two wires connected to the resistor to see if the fan works when the low speed relay (J30) engage?

The issue could also be caused by the low speed wiring or the low speed relay.
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The small bit in the resistor housing is a thermal fuse. If that has blown then the resistor won't work.
You can try to replace the thermal fuse, but you obviously need to solder it VERY quickly to avoid blowing it again!!

Needs checking with a test meter. Borrow one if you don't have your own.

As for the thermostat. That won't be the reason your engine is running hot or loosing coolant. But it will be the reason it takes a while to warm up.
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Originally Posted by Henrik_45 View Post
The resistor don't look burnt

Have you tried to connect the two wires connected to the resistor to see if the fan works when the low speed relay (J30) engage?

The issue could also be caused by the low speed wiring or the low speed relay.
No havent tried that. You mean basically to put the wires from both small quickrelease things that go into the resistor when it is screwed into place?

I'll do it when the engine is on idle, right? Anything I have to watch out for?
I guess I could check the relay, and fuses also (which one is it)? The relay, where is it located?

Found some good reading about the engine coolant system
https://www.alfapower.nu/files.php?pid=348371&aid=48473

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Originally Posted by David C View Post
The small bit in the resistor housing is a thermal fuse. If that has blown then the resistor won't work.
You can try to replace the thermal fuse, but you obviously need to solder it VERY quickly to avoid blowing it again!!

Needs checking with a test meter. Borrow one if you don't have your own.

As for the thermostat. That won't be the reason your engine is running hot or loosing coolant. But it will be the reason it takes a while to warm up.
Maybe I should ask around for a test meter.

My coolant level seems to be fine, doesnt seem like a leak.

Last edited by Wester; 08-10-16 at 19:30.
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If you have a wire that has spades in each ends then just connect the two wires to this wire.
The circuit will then look like the resistor is shorted and you can test the rest of the low speed circuit.

And to your question:
Yes, let the engine idle until it gets above 90 °C and see if the fan kicks if earlier than it did before.
The fuse is ok as you did the test where the fan started at a temperature above 100 °C (at the gauge) at full speed
Currentlı the only failure is a broken connection in the low speed path wire (y to B, )resistor (O10), wire (A to relay), relay( J30) or ground connection (C11).

Low speed will start at approx. 92 °C and full speed will start at approx. 98°C.

As far as I know the relay (J30) is in front of the battery.

If you can get access to an Ohm meter then you can easily test the resistor. It should be approx. 0.2ohm
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Originally Posted by Henrik_45 View Post
If you have a wire that has spades in each ends then just connect the two wires to this wire.
The circuit will then look like the resistor is shorted and you can test the rest of the low speed circuit.

And to your question:
Yes, let the engine idle until it gets above 90 °C and see if the fan kicks if earlier than it did before.
The fuse is ok as you did the test where the fan started at a temperature above 100 °C (at the gauge) at full speed
Currentlı the only failure is a broken connection in the low speed path wire (y to B, )resistor (O10), wire (A to relay), relay( J30) or ground connection (C11).

Low speed will start at approx. 92 °C and full speed will start at approx. 98°C.

As far as I know the relay (J30) is in front of the battery.

If you can get access to an Ohm meter then you can easily test the resistor. It should be approx. 0.2ohm
Thanks so much for your help. I'm sorry but I'm kinda lost here. In the picture attached, are the two wires that goes into the resistor. It looks like i can get them out of the two quickrelease plugs they're attached to.

Now, do you mean combine these two wires without them going, like now, through the resistor. Or do you mean: start the engine, let it idle, (without these two wires connected to the resistor) let them touch each other. Or do you mean that I should with a wire that has spades on them that I have laying around(I don't have such a wire) using it to act as a "resistor"

Or do you mean like this: wire 1 that goes to resistor, wire 2 that goes to resistor, without them touching each other. Form like a Y shape with the help of the "spades" on a cut wire? I.e wire 1 to one side of the Y an wire 2 to the other side of the Y?

\ /
\ /
Y
I
I
I <dead end
like that?




Yes as it seems now it only activates at high temp. But the fan is working when I have the A/c on. So it's kinda fine? But not how it's supposed to be...

*UPDATE* I found this online, a way to test the resistor itself, while the AC is off. That seems manageable for a newbie like me:

"Its common for the low speed function of the fan to stop working therefore allowing the engine temp to run > 90 deg C

The 'LO-Speed RESISTOR' is located at the top of the radiator, nearest the battery

Try removing the resistor, check the connections & the resistance of it ... should be 0.3 ohmns

if it looks excessively burnt or shows an open circuit then replace it.

alternatively as a test try this:

1. car in netural, start the engine

2. leave the key at MAR position

3, disconnect the temp sender at the thermostat

4. watch the fan, after approx 2 seconds it should rotate at a low speed

5. after another 2 second sit should rotate at a much higher speed

if it only rotates at ONE speed then thats most likely to be the HIGH speed, confirming the low speed resistor is burnt out.... "


Because if it is the resistor, fine I can get a new one, if it is a more difficult problem like other wiring or such I'm not sure I'll fix it because I really just need the car to work until april. And to have it ready before nov the 7th.
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Last edited by Wester; 08-10-16 at 21:00.
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Quote:
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Thanks so much for your help. I'm sorry but I'm kinda lost here. In the picture attached, are the two wires that goes into the resistor. It looks like i can get them out of the two quickrelease plugs they're attached to.

Now, do you mean combine these two wires without them going, like now, through the resistor. .
Yes, this is what you do. The resistor limits the amount of current the fan sees which is why it runs slowly. If you use wire the same diameter as the wires connecting to the resistor there will be no resistance and the fan will run at full speed. If this happens (when the car gets hot enough) you can be sure that the resistor is faulty. There is no real disadvantage of using this as a permanent fix other than you won't have the slow speed on you fan anymore and it may wear out quicker than it otherwise would.

If it doesn't fix it you should look at the relay or the wiring from the relay next.
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(Post Link) post #38 of 48 Old 09-10-16 Thread Starter
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Yes, this is what you do. The resistor limits the amount of current the fan sees which is why it runs slowly. If you use wire the same diameter as the wires connecting to the resistor there will be no resistance and the fan will run at full speed. If this happens (when the car gets hot enough) you can be sure that the resistor is faulty. There is no real disadvantage of using this as a permanent fix other than you won't have the slow speed on you fan anymore and it may wear out quicker than it otherwise would.

If it doesn't fix it you should look at the relay or the wiring from the relay next.
Yes okay, I was just confused if I really should put the two wires together or to use a third wire I will try this. It would be golden if the resistor is the faulty part since it seems easy to replace. So, connect the wires. watch if the fan gets going around 92°? (Low speed) And then it is the resistor which is faulty

Since this is electrics and the car on idle, I assume I have to be careful so I don't get a real kiss(chock) from the wires...
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12 volts is not a problem, but if the connection is poor it will get hot and burn your fingers.

It's not unreasonable to suggest you buy a cheap multimeter, one with a beeper for testing circuit continuity. This sort of thing is fine: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/122085572113

There is also a place for test lights, but a meter does more.
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12 volts is not a problem, but if the connection is poor it will get hot and burn your fingers.

It's not unreasonable to suggest you buy a cheap multimeter, one with a beeper for testing circuit continuity. This sort of thing is fine: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/122085572113

There is also a place for test lights, but a meter does more.

I found this model in a store near me for 15pounds, seems good and it has a continuity meter.
UNI-T UT33D
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Good work, something like that will help in such a situation as you presently experience with the resistor.
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Good work, something like that will help in such a situation as you presently experience with the resistor.
Yeah and I'm sure it will come in handy for other things in the future, I'm usually allergic to buy things like this like this and then let it have 1 action and then put it in a drawer for ever. Will test the resistor in an hour. This is exciting.

I have to say thank you to all helping me this far. I've learned a lot so far. Usually I'm kinda good with technical stuff but that includes computers and TV etc. This is a whole new section of things I'm learning and I'm grateful
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There's a sensible point of spending, in the time to watch one episode of (for example) Keeping Up With The Kardashians, you could change the accessory belt of your 156 for the new belt price plus another £15, eg: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/252442152666

Which is a double win, less poisoning of the brain and less expenditure than if you pay a garage to do the job.
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Ok so now I tested the resistor with my instrument, also alternated which way the red and black. As the picture shows this is how I tested it. The multimeter shows nothing (OL or 0L) when i connect the red and black to the resistor. Is it broken, am I doing it right or does the resistor need to be attached to the wires in the car?

Ok so I also tested measuring with the meter set to 200m on the Ohm. It the reads numbers like:

67.0

02.3 if i change the orders of the cables.

26.7

And also Ol so overload. Now it appears that multimeters are hard to use under 1 ohm i read somewhere. With the numbers fluctuating so much for me it feels like it's not reliable. If i try to measure with the 20m ohm setting. It says ol, overloaded so no figures other than if i use the 200m ohm setting


Ok so i managed to get a 00.8 ohm reading with the 200ohm setting on (lowest) but it wasnt when connecting red and black to the connectors where the cables goes from the car. Maybe the resistor and or surfaces are oxidated or dirty.

When I tried continuity I attached the red and black on the clean surface near the green on the resistor. I managed to get a long beeeeep out of it. So that means what? That there is free flow through it?

Right now I don't see why I should try it out with a new resistor for 10 pounds.
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So regarding the last post.
I think my multimeter was too cheap to measure low ohms. Anyway. When I installed the resistor again in the car I did see that one place on it were it was metal against metal it had come loose and had a space on 1-2mm at most. I guess it has broken so I ordered a new resistor from ebay for 12 pounds. Seems like peanuts so that's what I'm going to try next.

And if it doesn't work despite a new resistor I'll look into the relay and other stuff.
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Update. It was the resistor. Fan kicked in at about 90-92°c. Sweet. Car passed the MOT so total of 8 faults are fixed. Though it is steel leaking some gas in the front.
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Well done. Love a simple fix!

Next the thermostat?
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Well done. Love a simple fix!

Next the thermostat?
Oh yes! It is. Only problem I'll have to talk my girlfriend into it that I need more hours with the car although it does the job for her now haha!
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